NMS section 1 (12/1/03)

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NMS section 1 (12/1/03)

Post by Nick on Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:38 pm

© 2001, 2003 awrm.org All Rights Reserved.
1
NATIONAL MILITIA STANDARDS
www.awrm.org
1.0 STATEMENT OF ETHICS
It is the duty of the citizen’s militia to protect and defend the unalienable Rights of
all members of the community. Under no circumstances will the militia of [state]
tolerate those who advocate acts of criminal violence, terrorism, racism or a change
away from our republican form of government; nor will it support any specific
political party or candidate, nor espouse any particular religious denomination or
doctrine. All members must understand the duties and obligation of both citizens and
government under the [Constitution].
1.1 MISSION STATEMENT
The members of the [state] unorganized militia shall ever stand, as have our
Forefathers before us, first to God, from Whom we acknowledge the Authority of all
Rights, and all the blessings of governments and to our native soil, [state]. We
therefore pledge:
To promote and defend the unalienable God-given rights of all citizens, regardless of
race, sex or national origin, as is expressed in the [state] [Constitution] and the Bill
of Rights of the [U.S. Constitution].
To promote and defend the principles of just government bequeathed to us by our
forefathers to whit, That the principle of the Tenth Amendment shall stand inviolate,
as history has shown that the greatest system of checks and balances exists with the
people and their States to check the powers accrued by the federal government.
That the integrity of the courts, be they local, State or federal, shall remain
uncontemptable providing that they shall respect and uphold the rights of the
citizens of [state], including but not limited to, upholding the due process of law, and
to preserve the right of trial by jury and to obtain immediate judicial review of cases
wherein abuse of basic [Constitutional] rights are questioned.
That all power is inherent in the people, and all free governments are founded on
their authority, and instituted for their Life, Liberty, and Property; for the
advancement of those ends they have at all times an unalienable and indefeasible
right to alter, reform, or abolish the government in such manner as they may think
proper.
That government being instituted for the common benefit, the doctrine of
nonresistance against arbitrary power is absurd, slavish, and destructive of the good
and happiness of mankind.
That all just government is servant of the people who have instituted it, that the
people of [state] should never by force nor coercion be obliged to anything styled as
"law" which has not been promulgated by their duly elected representatives, nor any
as may be promulgated by them to bear conflict to the rights of the people, so that
no government shall be made master of the people of [state].
To promote and propagate the militia of [state] as a well regulated, (trained and
prepared) organization knowledgeable in historical precedent and current affairs, that is composed of common citizens.
To develop a cohesive and competent command structure.
To train our members in the many disciplines necessary to the function of the militia
as a whole and to the members individually.
To educate our members in areas of history, law and principle as compiled in the
experience and records of our forefathers.
To keep informed our members, and all citizens of events Local, State, National and
global that threaten to imperil our traditional Constitutional rights, or such as may
imperil the sovereignty of our Nation by the undue influence of those who have
forsaken their loyalty to our Nation, and to the principles upon which it was founded.
To repel foreign aggression and invasions, by preparing and training for defense and
by our encouraging and showing reason why all citizens should stand stoutly against
socialism, fascism, communism, humanism, and all forms of tyranny.
To suppress domestic insurrections and violence, by supporting and assisting the
appropriate Officers of the Law in upholding and maintaining law and order in
accordance with such Local, State, and Federal statutes and laws that do not present
jeopardy to our God given rights as acknowledged in the [state] and [U.S.
Constitutions].
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NMS section 2 (12/1/03)

Post by Nick on Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:41 pm

© 2001, 2003 awrm.org All Rights Reserved.
3
NATIONAL MILITIA STANDARDS
www.awrm.org
2.0 DUTY AND CODE OF CONDUCT
1. I am a citizen of the State of [State], serving in the unorganized militia. I am
prepared to give my life to guard and protect my homeland, our common law rights
and liberties and our way of life. This service is a duty of my citizenship.
2. I will keep and maintain the uniform, equipment, and weaponry necessary to
perform the duties prescribed for the militia of [State] and will be prepared to
mobilize quickly.
3. I will never forget that I am a citizen of the State of [State], and through her, of
these United States. I am responsible for my actions and dedicated to the principles
that made this country free. I will strive to lead an exemplary life and never, by
action or statement, bring discredit to the militia, my country, or my fellow
countrymen.
4. In all cases, I shall endeavor to inform and urge all citizens to return to the
Constitutional Republic our forefathers envisioned.
5. I will stand by or come to the aid of my brothers of the militia with whatever
means necessary and without question or concern for my own well-being to ensure
due process of law as stated in the Constitution.
6. I will never misuse my position in the militia for financial or personal gain, nor will
I engage in any activity subversive to the militia.
7. I will never surrender of my own free will. If, in command, I will never surrender
the members of my command while they have the means to resist.
8. If am captured, I will continue to resist by all means possible. I will make every
effort to escape. I will accept neither parole nor special favors from the enemy.
9. Should I become a prisoner of war, I am bound to give only my name, rank, and
date of birth. I will make no oral or written statements disloyal to the United States
and its citizens or harmful to their continued struggle for liberty and freedom.
10. Should I become a prisoner of war, I will keep my faith with my fellow prisoners,
and accept no favors from the enemy. I will give no information nor take part in any
action that might be harmful to my comrades. If I am a senior, I will take command.
If not, I will obey the lawful orders of those appointed over me and will support them
in every way.
2.1 GENERAL GUIDELINES
General Membership:
General membership in the militia of [State] is open to all lawful citizens of the State
of [State] at the age of 18-70. There shall be no discrimination due to, race, sex,
national origin or physical characteristics. Membership is voluntary.
All prospective members shall be required to give their name, date of birth, address,
contact information, next of kin, and general information detailing prior military
experience and/or other such skills as may be utilized by the militia.
All such information shall be kept private under all circumstances, and destroyed in
the event of crisis; And shall be used for no other purpose than the internal business
of the unit.
All members will be required to pass a ninety day probationary period after which the
are required to subscribe to the Code of Conduct and swear or affirm the membership oath.
Personal Equipment:
Each member will be issued an itemized list of certain personal and Unit equipment
which he must procure and maintain. This equipment is necessary to the
performance of his duties, personal sustenance and hygiene; and shall be maintained
packed and ready for deployment at all times. A 20 minute or shorter departure
capability is strongly recommended.
Each member shall bring with them enough food rations and water to sustain them
during meetings, training and camp musters.
Weapons and Ammunition:
Each member is required to provide and maintain his own weapons, stocks of
ammunition and deployment gear. Members are required to remain proficient in the
maintenance and safe operation of their weapon; and to have on hand at all times
300 rounds for the rifle and 100 rounds per sidearm. Lacking the depth, resources
and re-supply capabilities of a conventional military unit; militia members are urged
to acquire at least 2000 rounds of ammunition and 6 magazines per rifle as well as a
cleaning kit and spare parts. Standardization in caliber and weapons type within each
unit is strongly encouraged. Only in self-defense or during properly supervised
training sessions will a member discharge his weapons. All members are expected to
abide by all Constitutional State firearms regulations.
Training:
All active duty members will be expected to pass Level One line qualifications.
Support personnel will train in their assigned area of duty.
Assembly and Muster:
Periodic assemblies, musters and meetings are necessary and shall be called to
achieve the overall goals of each unit. Regular monthly meetings shall be conducted
on the third Saturday or Sunday. Members must discipline themselves to schedule
and set aside time each month for musters and assembly for such purposes as field
training exercises. Therefore, members who miss 3 consecutive meetings without a
reasonable excuse will be dropped from the role. Members will be notified of such
dates, times, and places of all meetings.
While it is intended that the militia intrude as little as possible in the lives of it's
members, it is clear that individual members are volunteers who must be ready to
meet periodically and to deploy as need arises. It will be the objective of the
Command Staff to infringe as little as possible on the time of it's members,
recognizing the responsibilities of family and job.
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NMS section 3 (12/1/03)

Post by Nick on Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:42 pm

© 2001, 2003 awrm.org All Rights Reserved.
5
NATIONAL MILITIA STANDARDS
www.awrm.org
3.0 STRUCTURE
The primary goal of the militia is to form the nucleus of a strong civilian defense
organization. Furthermore, it is to maintain a constant state of readiness in the event
that it should be called up to perform its Constitutional functions.
All citizens who intend to form militia units, and those already established, are
encouraged to use this organizational structure to ensure a degree of
standardization, coordination, and parity between units and unit operations.
A militia unit can not and will not become a viable military organization, or have any
potential for effective civil defense and response, until the talk stops and purposeful
organization begins. Officers must effectively organize group efforts and provide for
training, unit organization, response strategies, intelligence, security and
communications. Logistics Officers must ensure the acquisition of resources
consistent with the tactical role assumed by the unit. Every member must acquire
and develop proficiency in the use of firearms, field and specialized equipment. Each
member must be committed to the purpose and goals of the unit.
In any organization, there needs to be a clear chain of command to insure effective
coordination of the smaller units. At the same time, units must be capable of
responding to the immediate circumstances without having to request permission to
act.
The fundamental rule guiding the organization is centralized principles and planning
with decentralized tactics and action.
To meet these goals and objectives; the organization is divided into several teams
under the direction of a command Staff.
3.1 BASIC TEAM ORGANIZATION
The fire team is the basic building block of the militia. It's creation and training
should be the first priority of any militia unit after the organization of the Command
team or staff. A team may be as small as 3 men or as large as 5, led by a M4
(Corporal). A Squad consists of a minimum of 6 members and is usually comprised of
three 4-5 man teams led by a Squad Leader M5 (Sergeant).
1. Squad/Team Leader: The squad leader carries out the orders issued to him by the
commander. He is responsible for the discipline, appearance, training, control,
conduct and welfare of his squad at all times, as well as the condition, care, and
economical use of it's equipment. He is also responsible for the tactical employment,
fire discipline, fire control and maneuver of his squad. He takes position where he
can best carry out orders of the CO; and observe and control the squad.
Team Leader: There is one team leader per 4 men. His duties are the same as those
of the squad leader and he is also an Assistant Squad Leader.
2. Radio Operator: The team radio operator will carry and maintain the teams radio
equipment. He will be trained in basic radio operating procedures including COMSEC
and SIGINT. He will aid the Squad leader in keeping in contact with other units. Each
team leader will carry and be trained in the use of 2m 6m HD or GMRS or CB
depending on the unit for inter-unit communications.
3. Medic: This is the team member with the highest level of medical training. If
possible he should be trained as a First Responder or an EMT. The Medic is
responsible for overall field health and sanitation of the team. He must make sure
the teams first aid gear is in order at all times and is responsible for the teams water
supplies. He will carry medical gear over and above that required for individuals.
4. Heavy Gunner: This is the team member who will lay down suppressive fire and
cover likely avenues of approach. He will be equipped with a large number of high
capacity magazines and must have the ability to carry extra weight
5. Sharpshooter: This is the team member who is the most accurate shot of the
group. He will train other members in rifle marksmanship. The sharpshooter will pull
point and set the pace when on the march. He will provide team surveillance and
recon. He will be equipped with a MBR rifle and scope.
Training:
All team members must pass Level 1 line qualifications. They must also train and
cross-train in five basic skills. The primary skills being: Operations/ Intelligence,
Engineering/Demolitions, Marksmanship, Medical and Communications. The Team
Leader must be knowledgeable in the first skill and Commo. At full strength a team
should have two persons in each assignment. Each team member will train in two
assignments; a primary skill, and a secondary skill in case the primary man is
unavailable.
3.2 TEAM DIVERSIFICATION
Since the team is the basic building block of the organization. They must also
diversify by emphasizing and perfecting certain skills that are unique to their primary
team function.
There are three types of teams: 1-Command, 2-Security, 3-Support:
*1 COMMAND TEAM: is the leadership of the unit and provides planning, training
and issues orders to be carried out by the individual teams. The CT meets on the
first Saturday of the month. They have a P.O. Box, landline #, email and fax.
Initial Organizational Objectives:
1. Establish a working relationship between other teams.
2. Establish local and regional Rapid Alert System (security, intelligence, and
communications).
3. Organize logistical and administrative services.
4. Institute training program.
5. Recruitment
The Command Team's responsibilities include:
> Dissemination of constitutional principles and ideology to the rank and file.
> Development and dissemination of training material and methods to be used
within the individual teams.
> Development and security of tactical and strategic contingency plans for
implementation by the tactical teams.
> Coordination of the various teams.
> Development and operations of public relations within the community.
Command Team Organization and Duties:
S-1 Executive Officer
...2nd in Cmd
...Disseminates written communication (orders) to subordinate units.
...Handles administrative duties
...Serves as Public Relations Officer
S-2 Intelligence / Communications Officer
...Maintains and administers the Rapid Alert System
...Supervises the counterintelligence program and operational security systems
...Maintains the security of encoding/decoding systems
...Supervises intelligence gathering activities
...Analyses and reports intelligence information
S-3 Operations / Training Officer
...Establishes and enforces training standards
...Tailors training to specific missions
...Coordinates with the Intelligence Officer and develops the Threat Assessment
Folder
...Planning of operations under C/O's directions
S-4 Supply / Logistics Officer
...Responsible for the acquisition and accountability of all supplies and material.
...Supervises all logistical support activities including: transport, evacuation, and
medical, supply service and management.
*2 SECURITY TEAM: These are your Primary Forces. They provide security for all
facilities, conduct patrols, and provide defense. Each team consists of 4 men and a
team leader, communications, rendezvous points, staging areas, and standing
orders. They execute the orders of the CT and train within their own unit.
*3 SUPPORT TEAMS (Supply and Logistics): The support teams consist of those
who are unable, unwilling, or ill-equipped for active duty. Their task is to provide
whatever support is needed by the other units.
* The Supply Team supports the company by procuring and delivering needed
equipment and provisions. They may also be use as messengers between the CO and
the tactical units.
Supply Requirements:
Re-supply is a particularly important consideration for all mobile units and for
protracted emergencies. Each unit must plan and provide for storage and
independent caches of the following:
food, fuel, clothing, shoes, shelter, medical equipment, combat equipment, arms,
ammunition, and communications equip.
Purchase supplies in quantity and if possible coordinate purchases with other
individuals or groups for economy and standardization. Special attention is recommended for establishing safe houses and unit caches at strategic locations within the units AO. Particular emphasis should be placed on the individual
acquisition of a minimum of a one year supply of food and water for each family
member, and the secure storage of it.
*The Medical Team supports operations by setting up and maintaining an aid station
to receive and care for sick and wounded. There should be one member of each
tactical team trained as a Field Medic. Field medics must see to it that a preventative
medicine program is instituted and adhered to. Field sanitation and personal hygiene
must be of paramount importance.
SUGGESTED COMPANY ORGANIZATION:
Each independent county militia unit shall be recognized as a company. Unit size is
determined by group mission, members and leadership. Smaller affiliated units are
strongly recommended over large organizations. Once established, company
commanders should seek to coordinate with existing units and individuals within and
without the state militia organization. After several counties are organized into
companies, they can coordinate their efforts by forming Battalions comprised of 4 to
5 neighboring counties.
TOTAL COMPANY STRENGTH:
During the Initial start up phase, the following should be considered the minimum
size necessary to form an effective small unit. Once established, the small unit can
build upon it's core "leadership" through additional recruitment and training until the
company attains full operational strength.
Initial Start-up Phase---15 Men
Command Staff-----------5
Primary Forces Level 1--6
Support---------------------4
Skeleton Company=53 Men:
Command Staff -- 5
Primary Forces - 24
S.O.G.------------- 12
Support-------------12
---4 Medics
---4 Supply/Logistics
---4 Transport/Maintenance
Full Strength Company:=116 Men:
Command Staff----8
Primary Forces---36__3 Squads
S.O.G.--------------36__3 Squads
Support-------------24__2 Squads
Reserve/Security-12__1 Squad (Level One Primary Forces whose duty is to protect
command staff, support units and base infrastructure)
Company Rank Structure:
Company Commander Captain
S-1 Executive Officer 1st Lt.
S-2 Comm / Intell. 2nd Lt.
S-3 Operations / Training First Sergeant M7
S-4 Supply Master Sergeant-M6
Platoon Leaders.............3_M6 Master Sergeant
Squad Leaders...............9_M5 Sergeant
Team Leaders..............18_M4 Corporal
Privates.........................81_M3 Private
*NOTE*
In many if not most cases, a militia company will not be at full strength; therefore
some personnel will have to do double duty. Because individual members may have
to wear more than one hat; EVERY member must be trained in a Primary Skill and
cross-trained in more than one Secondary Skill .
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NMS section 4 (12/1/03)

Post by Nick on Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:44 pm

© 2001, 2003 awrm.org All Rights Reserved.
10
NATIONAL MILITIA STANDARDS
www.awrm.org
4.0 RANK STRUCTURE
M-1 Recruit
In basic Level One training, undergoing screening and evaluation during mandatory
90 day probationary period. This is also the entry rank for those who respond to a
real call up.
M-2 Private
Basic militiaman-has attained Level One training and equipment standards. Can
operate unsupported in the field for a 24 hour period.
M-3 Private First Class
Primary Forces militiaman - Assistant Team Leader. Must assist in the training of M-
1's through the buddy system or one on one interactive training. Has met all Level
Two training and equipment standards. Can operate unsupported in the field for a 72
hour period.
M-4 Corporal (Team Leader)
Has served as an M-3 for a period of 6 months. He has mastered all Level 1 and 2
skills and is capable of teaching them to others. The M-4 has a good working
knowledge of small unit tactics, troop leading procedures and has proven his
leadership qualities in the field.
NCO Grades:
NCOs are responsible for the discipline, appearance, training, conduct and welfare of
their men at all times; as well as the condition, care and economical use of all
equipment. The NCO must command and control the tactical employment, fire
control and discipline and movement of those placed under him. In the field, he
positions himself where he can best carry out the orders of his C/O while observing
and controlling his teams.
M-5 Sergeant (Squad Leader, SOG)
Has served as an M-4 for a period of 1 year. He is a master of all Level 1 and 2 skills
and is the lead instructor of his squad. He has proven leadership ability. He is
knowledgeable in advanced squad level tactics, resistance warfare, troop leading
procedures, mission planning and execution.
M-6 Master Sergeant (Platoon Leader)
M-6 Master Sergeant - Platoon Leader
He is the senior NCO at the platoon level and commands 3 squads. He is the senior
training officer for his platoon. It is his responsibility to maintain the combat
readiness of his men at all times.
M-7 First Sergeant (Company Level Command Staff)
He is the senior NCOIC and Operations / Training Officer. He oversees all training
within the company. He coordinates with the S-2 and assists the Commanding officer
in operational planning.
M-8 Sergeant Major (Battalion Level Command Staff) Command Staff will
consist of a squad of M3 and M4s for security and message dispatch couriers in
addition to the radio operator.
*NOTE: Grade Modifiers*
Modifiers are necessary to allow command to assign NCO leadership to lead new
recruits as they become available. Training of active members as NCOs capable of
leading at the squad level is the greatest force multiplier. Knowledge, ability and
dedication are the only valid criteria to assign rank within the militia. Rank modifiers
are the only way to determine if a militiaman is able to carry out a specific mission.
The rank and the modifiers are included in the individual training card and is the only
information to be transferred to a roster.
0XX Unfit for front line combat - due to age (45+) or physical disability. but, has met
all other Level 1 and 2 requirements. This person is capable of operating in a support
role such as training, communications, medical, supply and logistics. In the case of
military veterans; their primary mission will be the training of others.
1XX Minimum physical fitness level - 2 mile Field march w/Level 1 gear in 30
minutes.
2XX Moderate physical fitness level - 3 miles field march w/Level 2 in 40 minutes.
3XX Excellent physical fitness level - 5 mile field march w Level 2 (72 hour) gear in 2
hours.
X1X Basic Marksman - “Recruit” score on Marksmanship Qualification Test
X2X Advanced Marksman - “Sharpshooter” score on Marksmanship Qualification Test
X3X Expert Marksman - “Expert” score on Marksmanship Qualification Test
X4X Designated Marksman (Sniper) - “Expert” score and meets DMR scoring on the
MQT
XXA Qualified with 5.56
XXB " " 7.62x.39
XXC " " 7.62x.51 (308)
XXD " " 7.62x.59 (30.06)
XXE " " .50 cal
XXE " " Other
UNIT PROFILES
Primary Forces:
"Minutemen" represent the backbone of the militia. These are the basic 'light
infantry" combat troops. They must be able to shoot, move and communicate. They
are trained to Level 2 standards, basic team tactics, conducting raids and patrols. as
well as providing secondary combat support for the special operations teams. They
are organized into 4 person teams, which are combined to form 12 man squads.
Some of the Primary Force missions include:
*Guard duty
*Patrolling
*Security and Warning - keeping enemy forces under surveillance.
*Intelligence - collecting information, watching civilians, monitoring refugees,
reporting attempts by enemy agents to infiltrate the area, and identifying informers.
*Logistics - providing transportation, medical care/supplies, establishing and
guarding caches, collecting food, clothing ammunition etc.
*Requiting - identifying, screening, and recruiting personnel for active resistance
units.
*Psychological OPS - spreading rumors, leaflets, posters and graffiti, keeping the
belief in final victory alive in the minds of the populace, intimidating or elimination of
known collaborators.
*Evasion and Escape - establishing safe houses and evacuation plans, furnishing
guides.
Special Operations Groups
Every company (county militia unit) is encouraged to maintain general Level 2 teams
as well as Special Operations Groups within each county or operational area. It is
recommended that the later be comprised of those with prior military experience,
who have received advanced training or otherwise possess special technical skills. It
is anticipated that SOG units will be of particular value for interregional response
operations including training, communications, surveillance and related support
efforts.
Mission:
Special Operations Groups are organized, trained and equipped to conduct
unconventional warfare in hostile, denied, or politically sensitive areas. They operate
independently or in coordination with the operations of other Primary forces teams.
S.O.G's use clandestine, covert, or low visibility techniques with oversight from the
Area Commander. Special operations differ from the conventional operations in the
degree of physical risk, operational techniques, modes of employment, independence
from friendly support, and dependence on detailed intelligence and indigenous
assets. S.O.G. must be able to operate underground for periods up to 8 days with no
outside assistance.
Organization:
S.O.G. forces are organized into 12 man squads led by a combat veteran or a
Sergeant who has attained M-5 / 33C standards. Each squad is broken down into 2
four man Recondo teams and 2 two man Scout/Sniper teams. Recondo is the
"special mission" team. Scout/Sniper is the "rogue element" sent out after the
enemy as needed.
Training:
All S.O.G members must meet all Level 3 minimum standards and train and cross
train in 6 primary skills: Unconventional warfare, Reconnaissance, Long Range
Surveillance, Scouting/Marksmanship, Medical and Communications. Each member
will be qualified in 2 areas.
S.O.G. Missions will include:
Training
Zero Contact Reconnaissance
Surveillance
Denial Ops
Raids
Ambush
Long Range Patrols
Scout/Sniper Ops
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NMS section 5 (3-28-04)

Post by Nick on Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:46 pm

NATIONAL MILITIA STANDARDS
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5.0 BASIC TRAINING PLAN
INTRODUCTION
The goal of training is to produce a combat ready unit that responds rapidly to
known or suspected enemy activity and defeats that enemy. Individual skills and
battle drill training are a key factor in achieving that goal. Leaders should tailor
training to realistic, challenging, and attainable goals. Battle drills must be
standardized but their tactical employment must remain flexible.
TRAINING PLAN:
1. The Training Plan is based on the "core training card" concept in support of the
brigades Mission Essential Training List (METL) requirements. The focus is to prepare
all personnel for mobilization. The intent is to provide meaningful training that can be
put into immediate use and to motivate personnel to actively accept greater
responsibilities.
2. The Training Plan will break down the " Core Training Card" into 4 quarterly
schedules. Three topics will be routinely taught on a repetitive cycle until the unit
reaches 100% training attainment.
3. Each unit will conduct a yearly Alert Mobilization Drill.
All members must commit themselves, individually, and in concert with their unit, to
learn and master as many basic skills as possible, including proficiency with firearms
(including field stripping and cleaning), hand signals, fields of fire, entrenchment,
camoflage, cover and concealment, individual and squad movement. Each unit
member is required to complete the mandatory training course to meet Minimum
Mission Essential Training (METL) requirements.
CORE TRAINING CARD
SKILL LEVEL ONE: (M2)
This is basic training which all new recruits (M-1) are required to complete within the
90 probationary period. Upon completion of Level 1 training the recruit will advance
to the rank of Private (M-2) and will be considered an active line member of the unit.
1. Command and Organization
2. Mobilization and Alert Readiness
.....a. Rapid Alert System / Alert levels
.....b. Evacuation: Routes, Rally Points
3. Physical Fitness 1XX
.....a. Field march for 2 miles in 30 minutes with all Level 1 gear. 3 to 5 second
rushes for 100 yards, 10 PU 10 SU
4. Basic Marksmanship X1X
.....a. Must score Recruit or better on the Marksmanship Qualification Test.
.....b. Must be able to load, clear malfunctions and field strip weapon for repair or
cleaning.
5. Individual Movement Techniques
.....a. low/high crawl
.....b. team file and wedge formation.
6. Individual Camouflage
7. Basic Field Communications:
.....a. Hand and Arm Signals
.....b. Basic Radio Operating Procedures
.....c. COMSEC / SALUTE / SITREP
.....d. Perform surveillance without the aid of electronic devices.
6. Basic First Aid:
.....a. Evaluate a casualty
.....b. Prevent / treat shock
.....c. Clear an object from the throat
.....d. Treat / prevent heat stroke and frostbite
.....e. Treat burns
.....f. Put on a field or pressure dressing
.....g. Apply a dressing to an open chest, abdominal, and head wound.
.....h. Splint a fracture
.....I. Perform CPR
.....j. Transport a casualty
.....k. Basic sanitation, preventative medicine and health maintenance
SKILL LEVEL TWO: (M3)
Skill Level 2 is required to advance to the rank of M-3 Private First Class and to be
considered capable of performing Primary Forces missions. M-3's must be prepared
to deploy quickly and remain in the field unsupported for 72 hours. He is a fully
functional and deployable militia soldier, capable of leading his squad and training
others.
To meet Level 2 standards one must have mastered all Level 1 qualifications and
equipment plus:
Physical Fitness: 2XX
Field march with all Level 2 gear 3 miles in 40 minutes.
Marksmanship: X2X
8 out of 10 in a 9" target at 200 yards.
Must have a thorough understanding of:
Troop leading procedures including the 5 paragraph OPORD, SALUTE, CARVER etc.
Small Unit Tactics
1. Immediate Action Drills
.....a. Move under direct fire
.....b. React to indirect fire
.....c. React to contact
.....d. Break contact
.....e. React to ambush, near or far
.....f. React to flares
2. Movement Techniques
.....a. Fire Team and Squad Wedge
.....b. File
.....c. Traveling, Traveling Overwatch and Bounding Overwatch
3. Perform Reconnaissance
4. Select and construct individual fighting positions
5. Set up Patrol Base camp
6. Cross danger areas
7. Basic Land Navigation
.....a. Identify topographic symbols and features on a map
.....b. Determine a location on the ground by terrain association
.....c. Measure distance on a map
.....d. Orient a map to the ground by terrain association
.....e. Determine direction with and without a compass
8. Basic Camoflage
.....a. Individual
.....b. Noise light and litter discipline
.....c. Field emplacements, or base camp
9. Emergency Preparedness
Every Primary Forces member must maintain a 3 month supply of the following and
the knowledge to use it.
.....a. Water Storage / Purification
.....b. Field Hygiene / Sanitation
.....c. Food Storage
.....d. Medical Supplies
10. Basic Survival Abilities
.....a. Identify wild foods in the A/O
.....b. Identify poisonous plants and snakes in the A/O
.....c. Locate and purify drinking water
.....d. Build a fire
.....e. Snare/trap wild game
......f. Locate, and construct a field expedient survival shelter.
SKILL LEVEL 4: (M5)
To progress to Skill Level 4 (S.O.G.), the militia soldier must have mastered all Level
3 qualifications. In addition he must master the following skills to the point that he
can teach these skills to others:
Sniper Operations:
Conduct a terrain survey
Conduct long range surveillance of target for intelligence personnel
Plan and implement a enemy harassment plan
Plan and conduct interdiction operations on key target personnel
Estimate range to target
Construct and use a ghillie suit
Construct and use a Sniper/Forward Observation Post hide
*Note* Each S.O.G. must maintain at least 4 men (2 Scout / Sniper teams) qualified
as Designated Marksmen - X4X: Must score Expert on the Marksmanship
Qualification Test and meet the MQT DMR requirements.
CQB:
Conduct room clearing with a team
Conduct building clearing with a squad
Level 4 (S.O.G.) Specialties:
At full strength each 12 man S.O.G. must also maintain 2 men qualified in each of
the following specialties:
Medical:
Trained as First Responder. EMT certified or Combat Life Saving class preferred.
Operations / Intelligence:
Plan and conduct a surveillance/recon patrol
Plan and implement psychological ops.
Prepare accurate Sitreps and assist Command Staff in the planning of operations.
Identify and track counter-resistance operations.
Maintain the units Threat Assessment and Target Acquisition Folders
Co-ordinate with signal personnel to implement the intelligence network
Relay and disseminate intelligence to neighboring units through the Signal Corps
radio network
Communications:
Must complete the Mil. Sig. Corps training program and have a thorough
understanding of Basic Operating Procedures, Tactical Comm., CommSec, the Rapid
Alert System, Sitrep / SALUTE, the Digital Encryption System and his unit C.E.O.I.
Must be able to operate all unit comm. equipment.
Build a field expedient, clandestine antenna
Transmit and receive Morse code
Must be able to develop, implement, maintain and operate the Rapid Alert System
for his local unit as well as a Battalion level entity.
Coordinate and integrate signal operations between all units at the battalion level
(region or the counties surrounding his A/O)
Engineering:
Design an erect anti-personnel barricades
Design and erect defensive positions including perimeter warning devices.
Design, prepare and oversee the construction of a guerilla operations base camp.
Conduct vehicle recovery.
Maintain and repair common vehicles in use by the unit.
Build and use an incendiary device made from common readily available material.
Build and use a termite device made from common readily available material.
Create a smoke screen
5.1 RIFLE QUALIFICATION COURSE
Rifle Course Rules
Target: IDPA (or IPSC), mounted so that the head is between 5’8” and 6’ from the
ground
Weapons Eligible: Any service rifle that is safe.
Ammunition: Any full powered service load. No target or squib loads. If shooting the
200 yd string of fire, 87 rounds are required. If not shooting the 200 yd string of fire,
then 82 rounds are required. (If also shooting the DMR portion – add 5 rounds).
Magazine Carriers: Magazine carriers must be worn in a legitimate magazine pouch
with all retention devices employed, as you would while on a night patrol through dense
jungle. (All fastex buckles secured, etc.)
Scoring:
IDPA target: 0 and -1 score as 0 (zero) points, -3 is one (1) point for major caliber, and
two (2) points for minor caliber
IPSC target – Zones A, B and C score as 0 (zero) points, with zone D scoring as 1 (one)
point for major caliber, and 2 (two) points for minor caliber.
For any shots outside the “0” zone – add up the shots, multiply that number by the major
(.5 point) or minor (1 point) point factor. For instance, shooter A had 3 shots outside the
0 zone and was shooting major caliber. Take the 3 shots times the major factor of .5
which equals 1.5 and this will be added to the final score.

Shooter B also has 3 shots outside the 5 zone but was shooting a minor caliber rifle. So,
take the 3 shots times the minor factor of 1 which equals 3 and this is added to the final
score.
Major Caliber: 7.62x39, 7.62x51, .30 ’06, 7.62x53 Russian, .303 British
Minor Caliber: 5.56x45; 5.45x39; .30 Carbine
Headshots: Where headshots are required, a hit in the head box will score 0 pts. If a
hit is made in the body proper, (defined as below shoulder level) a miss will be scored (5
points added to score).
Overtime shots. Since this is a “par time” course, the minimum time is ‘fixed’,
however, if the shooter takes longer than the “par time” – then those extra seconds will be
added to the score. For instance – if the shooter takes 5.17 seconds to complete a string
of fire – and the “par time” was 4.0 seconds – then 1.17 seconds (5.17 seconds minus 4.0
seconds) will be added to the final score.
Misses: For each ‘missed’ shot (shots that were fired but that did not hit the target) – a
five (5) point penalty will be added to the score.
Shooter condition: The shooter will wear his/her LBE/LBV during the whole test. The
LBV will be loaded with what the shooter normally takes on patrol, i.e. all magazines or
clips (stripper clips or en bloc clips) fully loaded (fully loaded magazines will be the
maximum amount of rounds the magazine is designed to hold – minus two at the shooters
preference, i.e. a 30 round magazine may be downloaded to 28, a 20 round mag may be
downloaded to 18, etc.), and full water compliment as a minimum.
The shooter will do 25 one (1) count ‘jumping-jacks’ (side-straddle-hops) prior to
starting. After completing stage 1, he will do 20 jumping-jacks prior to stage 2, 15
jumping-jacks prior to stage 3, 10 jumping-jacks prior to stage 4, and 10 jumping jacks
prior to the start of each stage after that. There is to be NO rest period after the jumpingjacks
to the start of the stage. The purpose of this is to keep the heart rate ‘up’ for the
duration of the test, to simulate physical exertion and to induce stress into the equation. It
is important for the shooter to see his/her performance under these conditions. (Example:
25 JJ’s at the start of the Head Shots, 20 JJ’s at the start of the 50 yard Chest Shots, 15
JJ’s at the start of the 100 yard Chest Shots, etc. If the 200 yard course is shot – the
patriot will do 120 JJ’s and if the 200 yard course is NOT shot – the Patriot will do 110
JJ’s.)
Starting Positions:
Rifle start position has the safety/selector ON for ALL strings of fire – EXCEPT
“Malfunction Clearance Drills #2 and #3. In other words, each time Range Officer asks
“Shooter Ready?” the shooter should double check to ensure the safety is ON.
Low Ready is defined by having buttstock in shoulder, with barrel pointed at 45
degrees towards the ground.
Patrol Position is defined by having the rifle waist high, “near” horizontal as the
following picture defines.
Malfunction Clearance Drills
For malfunction clearance drills, the malfunction will be induced manually, then
at the beep of the timer, the shooter will clear the malfunction and place one hit on a
target 50 yards away.
For example, for #1 stoppage, the shooter will ensure that there is NO round in
the chamber, but a full mag is in the well. The ‘start’ position will be with the rifle
shouldered as if one were shooting. At the beep, the shooter will switch the
safety/selector to ‘fire’ and pull the trigger. When the shooter realizes that the hammer
fell on an empty chamber, he will immediately perform the ‘tap-rack-bang’ drill. For
bolt-action rifles the shooter will manually cycle the bolt to chamber a round.
For the #2 stoppage, the shooter will ensure the chamber is empty, and then will
take an expended cartridge and place it in the classic ‘stove-pipe’ position, then will seat
a full mag. The shooter will start with the rifle shouldered. At the timer beep, the
shooter will visually observe the malfunction and then clear it, followed up by one shot
on a target 50 yards away. Bolt-action rifles will also simulate a stove pipe, such as may
be caused by short stroking the bolt. Manually cycling the bolt while ‘flipping’ the rifle
on it side will clear the expended case and allow for a fresh round to be chambered.
For stoppage #3, the shooter will ensure the chamber is empty. Then the shooter
will place an expended cartridge in the chamber, and while holding the bolt back, the
shooter will then insert a full magazine, and then will ease the bolt forward to induce a
‘double’ feed. Then the shooter will shoulder the rifle, and at the beep will clear the
stoppage and fire 1 shot at a target 50 yards distant. For bolt-action rifles, a stuck case
will also cause a ‘double feed’. Immediate action for this stoppage with a bolt action
would be to pull the bolt back and either push the live cartridge back down into the rifle
magazine, then while holding the fresh cartridge down, push the bolt forward to snap the
extractor over the stuck case. Then manually cycle the bolt to extract/eject the spend
round, and the chambering a liver round. The second method is to dump all the rounds
out of magazine via the magazine release lever/button, THEN cycling the bolt to
extract/eject the stuck case, followed by charging the rifle via a stripper/en bloc clip,
ramming/allowing the bolt to close, and then fire.
Procedure for ‘magazine changes’ when using a bolt action rifle. The same
procedure that is used with magazines can be used with ‘stripper clips’. If the stage calls
for ‘magazine retention’ – retain the spent stripper clip. When the stage calls for ‘no
magazine retention’ then the stripper clip will be dropped.
National Standards Rifle Course
1. Head Shots
Perform five times each, all shots offhand - all shots to the body are counted as a
miss. Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
a. 25 meters; Low Ready; 2.0 sec
b. 25 meters; Low Ready WEAK SIDE; 3.0 sec
2. Chest Shots
Perform five times each, all shots offhand - all shots to the head are counted as a
miss. Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
a. 50 meters; Low Ready; 2.0 sec
b. 50 meters; Low Ready WEAK SIDE; 3.0 sec
3. Chest Shots
Perform five times each, all shots offhand, or kneeling - shots to the head are
counted as a miss. start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
a. 100 meters; Low Ready; 4.0 sec
4. Chest Shots
Perform five times each, all shots kneeling or prone - start standing - all shots to the
head are counted as a miss. Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
a. 200 meters; Low Ready; 5.0 sec
DMR QUALIFICATION - PERFORM FIVE TIMES*
DMR QUALIFICATION – SHOT LAST after finishing the course.
Perform five times each, all shots kneeling or prone. Start standing. Head shots
ONLY: all others shots are counted as a miss. Start position is patrol ready, safety
ON.
a. 200 meters; Low Ready; 6.0 sec HEAD SHOTS ONLY
5. Malfunction Drills
Perform three times each
Manually induce malfunction, then at the 'beep' Clear Malfunction and place one hit
on target at 50 meters. Start position is rifle shouldered – safety ON.
a. Position One; 4.0 sec
(tap and rack)
b. Position Two; 4.0 sec
(stovepipe)
c. Position Three; 11.0 sec
(feedway stoppage)
6. Magazine Changes
Perform three times; starting position is with a round in the chamber and an EMPTY
magazine. Rifle at Low Ready.
Fire one shot, reload and fire one shot at 50 meters WITHOUT retaining magazine,
all mag pouches secured!
a. Mag change without retention; 9.0 sec
7. Magazine Changes
Perform three times; starting position is with rifle/magazine fully loaded. Rifle at Low
Ready.
Fire one shot, reload and fire one shot at 50 meters WITH retaining magazine and all
mag pouches secured!
a. Mag Change with retention 11.0 sec
8. Close Range Shooting from shoulder or Underarm Assault
Perform three times each side. Start in patrol ready position (rifle near horizontal
about waist high or buttstock in shoulder, muzzle down)
a. 3 meters; 0.6 sec
b. 7 meters; 0.8 sec
c. 10 meters; 1.2 sec
9. Multiple Targets
Perform twice each; starting position is at low ready with safety ON. Targets are
spaced with 1 meter between each target.
a. 5 meters; 2 targets; 1.2 sec
b. 5 meters; 3 targets; 1.5 sec
c. 5 meters; 4 targets; 1.8 sec
For IDPA Targets: "0" and "-1" zones score 0 points all calibers; "-3" zone is 1 point
multiplier for 'major' caliber, and 2 point
multiplier for 'minor' caliber
For IPSC Targets: "A", "B" and "C" zones score 0 points all calibers; "D" zone is 1
point multiplier for 'major' caliber and 2
point multiplier for 'minor' caliber
Shots fired after par-time has elapsed - add that many seconds to the score (i.e. last
shot was fired 1.37 seconds after par
time elapsed - add 1.37 points to score)
For all shots outside the "0" zone - add up all shots, times that by the major or
minor multiplier and divide by 2 - and that
number is added to the score (i.e. shooter had
2 shots outside the "0" scoring zone and was shooting minor caliber - so take the 2
shots times the "2" (for minor caliber)
which equals 4 - and then divide by 2 - which leaves 2 - so add 2 points to the final
score.
If he were shooting major caliber is would be 2 shots, times 1 (major multiplier)
divided by 2 equals 1 point added to final score.)
Scoring For 200 Yard Range:
Maximum = 0
Expert (M4) = 1-39
Marksman (M3) = 40-77
Sharpshooter (M2) = 78-116
Recruit (M1) = 117-231 (No Time Limit)
Scoring For Less Than 200 Yard Range:
Maximum = 0
Expert (M4) = 1-36
Marksman (M3) = 37-72
Sharpshooter (M2) = 73-108
Recruit (M1) = 109-216 (No Time Limit)
(If a 200 yard or smaller range was used for qualification, such should be marked on
the training card.)
*To qualify as DMR (Designated Marksman), the shooter must qualify as
Expert and achieve all five DMR head shots within the allotted time limit.
FAQ List for Rifle Qualification
1. Why is there no ‘movement’ (running, seeking cover, etc.) in this course?
Short Answer: What this course is designed to do is to test the ‘tactical shooting’ skill
level of the shooter. This course is NOT designed to test the ‘tactical movement’ skill
level, nor the athletic ability of the shooter.
Long Answer: Tactical movement in the ‘real world’ is dependent upon too many
variables to be able to make a ‘Standard Exercise’. For instance, there are times
when the tactical situation will demand stealth, (i.e. slow, deliberate movement) and
other situations in almost the exact environmental conditions and surroundings that
will call for dynamic movement (speed). Since the conditions that dictate the rate of
movement can’t be duplicated – we have opted to forego any ‘tactical movement’
during qualification. However, tactical movement should be practiced regularly, and
is best practiced through Force-on-Force type exercises using either paintball and/or
airsoft.
2. Are bi-pods allowed?
Short Answer: Yes, however the bipod must be attached to the rifle at all other times
too. In other words while you are on patrol, etc. Once you take the bipod off the rifle
– you must re-qualify.
Long Answer: We need to train correctly. Only perfect PRACTICE makes perfect. So,
one MUST shoot the course with one’s rifle that is set up to take on patrol. It would
defeat the purpose of this course to allow the attachment of bi-pods to only shoot
the course, and then remove the bi-pod for patrol. There may be some that say “I
have a detachable bi-pod that I keep in my ‘ruck, and when the shooting starts I can
quickly put it on”. Great – then that is how you will start the course. With your backpack
on, and once the timer beeps, you can take your back-pack off, dig around for
the bi-pod, attach it to your rifle, and shoot that particular sting of fire. Then before
the next timed fire begins, you can take the bi-pod off, put it in your ruck, and then
put your ruck on your back. This will be the procedure for every timed/scored event
(you will end up doing this 53 times).
3. Are Scopes allowed?
Short Answer: Scopes are allowed if that is what you ALWAYS have on your rifle. If,
when you are going on a 10 mile patrol, you have your scope attached to your rifle –
then that is how you will shoot the course.
Long Answer: This course will be a great ‘test-bed’ to help the shooter ascertain
whether his/her set-up is ready for the ‘real’ world. There are some that have all
kinds items attached to their rifle. This course will help them see if all the items are
necessary or not. For instance, most contact happens well under 100 meters – so the
10X scope that one has attached to their ‘fighting rifle’ will probably be a hindrance
when shooting at 25 yards. This course is designed to show the shooter the flaws in
his/her equipment, as well as the areas the shooter needs to concentrate more
training effort to (i.e. PRACTICE).
4. Are ‘Shooting Slings’ allowed?
Short Answer: Yes. However, the ‘start’ position will be that position that the sling is
in during the 8th mile of a ten mile hike.
Long Answer: The odds that someone would actually have a ‘shooting sling’ wrapped
around one’s arm for a 10 mile patrol is ZERO. Let’s get used to the idea of shooting
this course as it was designed – for chance contact (surprise contact). That means
you have NO warning that contact is immanent. So, shoot the course pretending that
you are 8 miles into a 10 mile patrol. In other words, once the time ‘beeps’ the start
signal – THEN if you wish you can wrap the sling around your arm and begin that
string of fire. Then after that string, ‘un-loop’ the sling from your arm to start the
next string.
5. Are ‘Patrol’ or ‘Tactical’ slings allowed?
Short Answer: Yes, if that is what is always attached to your rifle.
Long Answer: Yes, if that is what is always attached to your rifle.
6. Why are we not doing firearm transitions (switching from rifle to
handgun)?
Short Answer: Not everyone carries a sidearm on patrol. It is personal preference if
one does, or one doesn’t.
Long Answer: The sidearm is carried for two totally different purposes depending
upon the mission.
Typically one carries a sidearm as part of one’s first line gear. It is worn in such a
manner as to secure it to the person (so it does not become ‘lost’), and to protect it
from the elements. The holsters that best do this are not what one would consider
‘speed holsters’. So it would take too long to get one’s first line sidearm out of its
holster to ‘transition to’.
Another reason transitions are not done is the field is because of balance and
movement. Balance is essential to movement. Without balance, one cannot move
effectively. To perform the classical ‘transition’ movement, one ‘drops and rotates’
one’s rifle so it is hanging by the sling in either the front, side or rear of the shooter.
Then one ‘draws’ one’s sidearm and uses it to ‘drive on’. This is fine for CQB/Urban
type operations, because one can ‘stop’ once a room is secured. While one is stopped
one can get one’s primary (rifle/carbine) up and running, and return the sidearm to
its holster. The problem with the ‘field’ is there is no ‘room to secure’ – hence there
may not be an area to ‘stop’ and get one’s primary up and running. SO…you may
have to RUN for a few hundred meters before you can get fix your rifle. Try and RUN
for two hundred meters with your primary (rifle/carbine) dangling in front of you. It
will DESTROY your balance. And the heavier the rifle, the MORE it will destroy your
balance. Remember, without balance you cannot move effectively.
So, in the field while doing tactical shooting and moving, if your primary goes down –
PRETEND it is ‘up’. In other words, keep it in your hands. Obviously as SOON as you
can you will get it up and running again.
7. Why is there a penalty for ‘minor’ caliber?
Short Answer: There is only a penalty for ‘peripheral’ shots, i.e. shots that are ‘near
misses’. For all ‘good’ shots, the values are the same for major or minor calibers.
Long Answer: The debate regarding ‘which is best – 5.56 or 7.62 whatever’ will
continue to rage on LONG after we are all dead. These debates will continue because
there is a huge void of fact concerning the matter. And the reasons for that ‘fact
void’ is there are just too many variables about what happens when people get shot
with rifle (or handgun) fired projectiles.
However, some facts are available: The typical 5.56 rifles (in ‘rack’ form) weigh less
than rifles in 7.62. The 5.56 round itself weighs less than 7.62. The 5.56 rifles are
easier to carry, and the 5.56 recoils less than the 7.62 making shots a little easier.
So – those that shoot the 5.56 (and I am one of those) should be EXPECTED to
‘shoot a little better’ than those that choose the 7.62 - which I also have in both
varieties – the FN (7.62x51) and the AK (7.62x39).
Also – the major calibers ARE better at penetrating barriers than minor calibers are.
In other words what is cover to 5.56 may only be concealment to .308. For these
reasons the major calibers are given a little ‘break’. If you don’t like it – shoot a
major caliber rifle.
8. Why is shooting from the ‘weak side’ mandatory?
Short Answer: There is both strong and weak side cover in the world.
Long Answer: Do this experiment. TRIPLE VERIFY that your rifle is unloaded and DO
NOT take any live ammunition with your now unloaded rifle. Now go in your
bathroom (or any other place that has a large mirror). Pretend that the ‘mirror’ is a
corner and move enough of your body ‘into’ the mirror so that you can ‘shoot around
the corner’ in the mirror. As SOON as your rifle ‘enters the mirror’ enough to shoot –
STOP.
Look at how much of your body is ‘available’ for the ‘enemy’ to shoot. Now trade
shoulders and do the exact same exercise from the exact same side of the mirror.
Once you do this, you will see that you had to expose TWICE (double) the amount of
your body when you used the ‘wrong’ shoulder. This is why it is so important to get
used to using both sides of your body as a shooting platform.
This way, as you are running up to some cover, (and it happens to be ‘left side’
cover) you will AUTOMATICALLY switch to your left shoulder and better utilize that
cover (maximize your hit potential and minimize your exposure to enemy fire).
Another reason is the majority of wounds in a combat environment (not necessarily
combat itself – but the whole combat environment – just running around in a combat
environment makes ‘extreme sports’ look like a kindergarten playground!) are
‘extremity’ wounds. Wounds to the hands, shoulders, legs and feet. So – if one is
wounded in the ‘strong’ arm, then one would have to use one’s ‘weak side’ to shoot
from. Well, what if one had NEVER practiced shooting from one’s weak side?? How
effective would they be? Not very.
9. Why are we not shooting from more ‘positions’?
Short Answer: For simplicity, most of the work is done from the standing position,
with some stages in kneeling or prone, shooters choice. This avoids the possible
confusion of the different variations of ‘shooting position’.
Long Answer: For all 'chance contact' - return fire should initially be from the position
one finds oneself in when the first rounds fly, and that will be standing (or
squatting). After that point one will be running, or squatting, or kneeling, or prone,
or some variation of the above ‘positions’ – all dependent upon other variables like
terrain, near or far ambush, etc. In other words, whatever position/positions are best
for the tactical environment.
For all other applications, for example setting an ambush, one has TIME to figure out
what position would be best for the job.
We think it is best to train for the 'unexpected' contact than the one where you have
lots of time to figure your ‘position’ out.
However, as in the statement above regarding ‘tactical movement’ – position
assumption should and must be practiced, so that your body can easily get in and
out of the various positions in order to maximize your hit potential and minimize
your exposure to enemy fire. Dry fire practice, followed up live fire practice will help
instill these positions into your repertoire of skills. Then Force-on-Force training will
allow you to hone these skills even further.
10. What is the difference in scoring ‘major’ and ‘minor’ caliber?
Short Answer: There is a delicate balance of time vs. accuracy. The old adage that
one ‘cannot miss fast enough’ is true. Only hits count. Time is added at a 1 to 1
ratio, peripheral hits are added at a .5 ratio for major and a 1 to 1 for minor caliber.
This helps to reflect this balance of time vs. accuracy.
Long Answer: What we do not want is for the shooter to try and ‘game’ this course.
In other words, for the shooter to decide that it is better to have a miss and let the
‘par time’ stand, or to take a additional 1.5 seconds and have a peripheral hit. Let’s
use this example and look at the score difference. Shooter A takes an additional 1.5
seconds to score a peripheral hit. He is shooting minor caliber. The peripheral hit
scores a one (1). Add the 1.5 second overtime shot to the point value of 1 – this
equals 2.5 points which is added to the score. This encourages the shooter to get a
hit, even if it is overtime. This is far preferable to not even shooting the shot and
adding a 5 point penalty to the score for a ‘miss’. This also discourages ‘rushing’ the
shot, i.e. the shooter tries to go so fast that they miss. In other words, one could
take an additional 4 seconds and have a peripheral hit with a minor caliber rifle
(which would add 1 point) to be the same ‘point value’ of a miss. So this scoring
system REWARDS HITS – even if they are ‘over-time’ hits. Slower hits are better
than blazing fast misses.
11. What if the shooter carries/uses ‘double mag holding devices’ (such as
the “MagCinch” or homemade devices that do the same thing)? How does
that affect the ‘mag changes’?
Short Answer: Sure, the shooter can have that in his rifle, but he still must ‘change
mags’ “from the pouch”.
Long Answer: One of the stated purposes of this course is for skill development.
Reloading is a fundamental skill that must be practiced. “Bundled” magazines will
only save ONE ‘reload’ from the pouch. (Once both magazines are expended, must
one STILL reload from the pouch.) So – being true to the spirit of the course – the
shooter will perform ALL reloads FROM THE POUCH.
12. Gaming - in ANY form – will not be tolerated!
Short explanation: Gaming is trying to get a better score through methods and
means OTHER than becoming a better shooter.
Long explanation: Examples of ‘gaming’ would be; not having all the magazines in
the pouches loaded (so your 2nd line gear is ‘lighter’), using a ‘muzzle break’ for the
RQC but then using a flash suppressor while on patrol (the muzzle break may help
get faster shot-to-shot times), using a totally different rifle for the RQC than is
regularly used on patrol (this should not be confused with the patriot using different
rifles for the RQC – for instance, I shoot the RQC with my M4, my AKM and my FNFAL
– as I DO use all three rifles, but I usually use my M4), emptying almost all of
the pouches on the LBE/LBV to make it ‘lighter’ for the RQC, etc.
The bottom line is this. This course was designed to test the shooter, his rifle, and
his equipment. Let the course DO that. If you come up with a ‘what if…’ question,
ask yourself this FIRST – BEFORE you ask the R.O. (range officer). Does my request
HELP me practice the skills I need to know, or does my request ‘short-cut’ the skills I
need to know? MOST OF THE TIME, the answer you would say to yourself is – nah, I
am trying to short-change my training or get a better score without really
learning/practicing my skill set. Or in other words, by asking this question to the RO,
I am trying to be a ‘better shooter’ ON PAPER than I can really show in real life. That
kind of attitude can lead to the death and or injury of yourself, your team-mates,
and those that are depending upon you and your team. GUARD AGAINST THAT
ATTITUDE (gaming)!!!!
13. Can I ‘take a knee’ while clearing malfunctions and during reloads?
Short Answer: Yes, at the shooters option. If he elects to take a knee, he may also
shoot from the kneeling position.
Long Answer: Most of the time it is sound doctrine to take a knee ANYTIME you are
not ‘in the fight’. This makes a smaller target for the bad guys to hit, and it also can
signal to your team-mates that you are ‘not in the fight’ and they can ‘cover’ your
‘area’ for you.
However, be advised that there ARE circumstances where it would NOT be healthy
idea to take a knee. It is totally situational dependent. So, it is a good idea MOST of
the time – but not ALL of the time. (For instance – if caught in a near ambush, while
rushing through the ambush you have a malf. You gonna drop to a knee and fix it in
the ‘kill zone’?? No…your gonna yell BANG, BANG as you run through the ambush
and fix the malf while on the run to a rally point. There are other examples too. In
other words – never say ‘never’.)
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NMS section 6 (12/1/03)

Post by Nick on Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:46 pm

© 2001, 2003 awrm.org All Rights Reserved.
27
NATIONAL MILITIA STANDARDS
www.awrm.org
6.0 EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS: M1 - M3
FIELD UNIFORM:
A minimum of three sets BDU's. Flectarn, woodland camo, or olive drab. The exact
type of uniform will depend on AO and unit standards. You also need a field jacket
with a liner, extra heavy wool socks, a pair of gloves, the best boots you can afford
and a boonie hat.
Unit patches are to be worn on the right shoulder. The "[State]” name tape is to go
over the left breast pocket. Name Tag will go over the right.
MINIMUM/RECOMENDED FIELD EQUIPMENT
M1
1. Rifle and 100 rounds ammunition in mags or stripper clips
.....Standard Caliber: (a).223, (b)762x39, (c).308, (d)30.06, (e).50, (f)Other
2. Load Bearing Equipment consisting of:
......*Pistol belt
......*H-back Suspenders
......*Ammo pouches (2)
......*Canteen w/cover, cup and stove
......*Butt-pack
3. Field Equipment:
......*Cleaning kit for rifle
......*First aid kit
......*Poncho w/liner
4.Basic Survival Kit
......*Toilet paper
......*Water purifications tabs
......*Water-proof matches
......*Sheath Knife
M2
1. M1 gear
2. Field Equipment
......*Smoke canisters
......*2 Flares
......*Leatherman tool
......*Mini-mag lite w/red filter and spare batteries
......*Compass (carry in BDU's)
......*Signal mirror
......*Whistle
......*Topo map of Operational Area (carry in BDU's)
......*Note pad w/2 pencils
......*FRS/GMRS or 2m,6m or CB radio depending on unit w/headset
......*Mini binoculars 10 X 25
......*Camo face paint and/or face veil
......*6 Trioxane fuel bars (carry in BDU's)
......*Magnesium fire starter (carry in BDU's)
......*Toilet paper in zip lock bag (carry in left BDU pants pocket)
......*First Aid Kit (carry in right front pants pocket)
......*Gas Mask and 3 filters, with hood and carry bag
3. Pack equipment
......*Water-proof bags
......*3 pair socks, 1 extra t-shirt
......*Jacket
......*1 OD mil. ground cloth
......*Poncho w/ liner
......*Sleeping pad
......*50 feet of # 550 cord
......*Candle
......*Hygiene kit: soap, toothbrush, toothpaste, razor etc.
......*Three to seven days field rations
Field Rations: MRE's or self packed rations.
Prepack these items in zip-lock bags. Instant oatmeal, pop-tarts, breakfast bars,
dried fruit, raisins, beef jerky, nutri-grain bars, Ramon noodles, cup-o- soup, bullion
cubs, rice, Instant coffee, cocoa, or drink mix. You need a minimum of 2000 calories
to remain active on your rations. Don’t cut your self short.
M3
1. M1 and M2 gear
2. Rifle and 300 rounds of ammo in mags or stripper clips
3. AO specific Field Equipment:
......*AO specific sleeping bag (20 degrees or lower rating)
......*H20 bladder
......*Water filter device w/2 filters (PUR hiker)
......* AO specific cold or Hot weather gear
OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT:
Each team should have the following:
1 field deployable HF transceiver with NVIS field antenna (Yaesu FT-817 or better)
1 4 man camo tent
Portable battery packs with a solar panel
1 Laptop w/packet software and cables
1 Bionic Ear
1 Infrared heat detector
1 Night vision headset
1 ATV
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NMS section 7 (12/1/03)

Post by Nick on Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:48 pm

©️ 2001, 2003 awrm.org All Rights Reserved.
29
NATIONAL MILITIA STANDARDS
www.awrm.org
7.0 TROOP LEADERS GUIDE
LEADERSHIP DOCTRINE
BASIC LEADERSHIP PRINCIPLES
INTRODUCTION
The role of officers is to coordinate training and public relations, maintain order,
provide for equipment and communications, provide leadership in tactical and
operational activities, and to provide for all basic requirements necessary for unit
integrity and proper function, including the assignment, development and
deployment of tactical teams as appropriate to the role and function of the unit.
Officers should make every effort to keep the unit organization and command
structure as simple as possible; while providing for unit and command security,
autonomous operations, continuity of command and structure/organizational
flexibility.
OFFICER SELECTION
Members of individual units will elect their own officers. Extreme care should be
exercised to select only those who are competent, qualified, capable, and honest
individuals, who have risen thru the NCO ranks and those who can effectively
organize and lead their units. Prior military experience should be considered a plus.
MODEL OATH FOR COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
"I (Name), having been duly elected as an officer in the (Blank) State Militia, in the
grade of (grade), do solemnly swear/affirm that I will uphold the Constitutions of
these united States and the State of (blank) against all enemies, both foreign and
domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this
obligation freely, without reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will faithfully
discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter: So help me God.
LEADERSHIP
Leadership traits are 'characteristics' of leadership. They are part of your character.
If you don't have these, work to get them. Because without them, you CAN NOT be a
leader. All you can do at that point is be a pusher, not a Leader. A leader leads from
the front, a nonleader leads from the rear.
Here are the characteristics one MUST have to be an effective leader.
LEADERSHIP TRAITS
1. Integrity - It is more than being honest. Integrity is doing what you ought to do,
and NOT doing what you ought not to do, even if nobody else is around to see.
2. Knowledge - Know your job, weapons, equipment, your men, tactics etc. Always
impart that knowledge to your men.
3. Courage - A leader possesses both physical and moral courage.
4. Decisiveness - A leader is unafraid to make a decision, and does not vacillate once
the decision is made.
5. Dependability - Be dependable. Accomplish the mission.
6. Initiative - Think ahead. Do what needs to be done. Improve something that
needs improving. Don't stifle initiative in your men! Instill it!
7. Tact - The 'tactful' leader is fair, firm and friendly.
8. Justice - Don't play favorites. Spread the good and bad out evenly (with respect to
missions work parties etc.).
9. Enthusiasm - Show it; others will follow your lead.
10. Bearing - Bearing is how you carry yourself.
11. Endurance - Don't even THINK about quitting. Be strong both physically and
mentally.
12. Unselfishness - Give credit where credit is due. Make sure your men are taken
care of before you look to yourself.
13. Loyalty - Be loyal to your men and they will be loyal to you. Loyalty up and
down.
14. Judgment - Weighing all the facts, along with application of the other 13 traits
and making the best move.
PRINCIPLES OF LEADERSHIP (Techniques)
1. Take responsibility for your actions and the actions of your men. No buck passing.
2. Know yourself and seek self-improvement. Tally your strengths and weaknesses,.
Work on the weaknesses and develop your strengths.
3. Set the example - Live what you say because your actions will speak louder than
your words.
4. Develop your subordinates. Strengthen them. Build them up physically, mentally
and morally. They are the next generation of leaders; so develop the kind of leaders
that you would want to have.
5. Ensure that a job (mission) is understood. Supervise it and carry it through to
completion.
6. Know your men and look out for their welfare.
7. Keep everyone informed. Your men aren't mushrooms. Give them all the
information you can.
8. Set obtainable goals for the team.
9. Make sound and timely decisions.
10. Know your job.
11. Emphasize Teamwork.
Tactics
"Always mystify. Mislead and surprise the enemy if possible. And when you strike
and overcome him, never let up in pursuit as long as your men have strength to
follow, for an army routed, if hotly pursued, becomes panic stricken, and can then be
destroyed by half their number."
...never fight against heavy odds, if by any possible maneuvering you can hurl your
own forces on only a part, and that the weakest part, of your enemy and crush it.
Such tactics will win every time, and a small army may thus destroy a large one in
detail, and repeated victory will make it invincible." Thomas J. Jackson
Attack the enemy at his weakest points.
Attack only when you have a 95% probability of victory.
Strike when and where least expected.
Never set patterns.
Never hesitate to use your most powerful weapons.
Always outgun the enemy.
Always fight on ground of your own choosing.
Limit the length of enemy contact to 3 minutes.
Never voluntarily take the defensive position.
Never allow the enemy freedom of movement or to make decisions.
Do not allow the enemy to bring his weapons to bear.
Always prepare backup forces and vehicles.
Allow for unforeseen problems.
Never waste personnel or resources.
Troop Leading Procedure
1. RECEIVE MISSION, BEGIN PLAN
a. Estimate the situation/analyze the mission per METT-T:
M--MISSION
...What is the mission / objective? What are the desired results or outcome?
E--ENEMY
...What is his numerical strength, disposition, activity by day or night? What is his
response time and avenues of approach? What are the locations of weapons,
fieldworks, obstacles, minefields, and sentries; are their any high/low tech warning
devices? Does he use flares or have night vision capability? If so, what do the
various combinations of numbers and colors mean? What type of patrols does he put
into the field? What is their average size and duration? Can he call in protective
cover fire from artillery and/or aircraft? What is the attitude of the unit commander?
The attitude of the NCO's and the line troops? How is their morale? Does the enemy
have any weaknesses that can be exploited? What forms of commo does he have
available and what frequencies are in use?
*NOTE...If objective is stationary, the recon should include a minimum of 24 hours of
target surveillance. This is in addition to constant surveillance during the immediate
24 hours preceding the engagement.
T--TERRAIN
...Make a thorough study of all available maps and photos. Make note of critical
features as reported by recon patrols. Note positions for observation and
concealment. Roads and trails. The locations of streams, their width and depth,
current velocity and underwater obstructions, bridges and crossing points.
T--TROOPS
...Is there any other resistance activity being conducted in the area? Can you
request support from other friendly forces in the area(s) of transportation,
communication, or medical assistance? Have any other units conducted extensive
patrols in the area? Would they be able to provide essential recon information?
T--TIME
...Plan the use of available time
b. Weather:
Check the weather forecast. What is the phase/intensity of the moon? What are the
times of sunset and sunrise? What are the expected day and night time
temperatures during the mission?
c. Organize men: Choose a qualified second in command. Choose the smallest number of personnel essential to the operation. Seect reserves. Makes sure all personnel are in good
physical condition and able to perform the mission. NO sneezers or coughers. If a
night ops, make sure there is no one that suffers from night blindness. Do you have
a medic? Do you need guides?
d. Select weapons and equipment:
What is the need or availability for any mission specific equipment/tools? Do you
need night vision equipment, sniper rifles, wire cutters, etc? What is the availability
of ammo, pyrotechnics, water and field rations?
2. ISSUE WARNING ORDER
a. Tell your selected personnel that a mission is imminent and the timetable for
same. Give them a brief statement (SMEAC) of the situation and the organization of
the patrol. Issue directions to all persons concerning: weapons, equipment, uniform,
removal of identification, any need to draw special items, ammo requirements and
rations. What type of camoflage is required. Who the second in command is. Who
will accompany you on the mission. What time is set for assembly.
3. CONTINUE ANALYSIS OF SITUATION / MISSION
a. Study terrain map, sketch for: OCOKA
(1) Observation and fields of fire
(2) Cover and concealment
(3) Obstacles
(4) Key terrain
(5) Avenues of approach
b. Make preliminary plan...Determine the need for support fire, supply and logistics.
Decide the troop strength of the patrol. Tentively establish and clear the main attack
plan, also review contingency plans for any probable foul-ups and a last ditch plan to
get the unit out of harms way in case it goes SNAFU. select weapons, determine the
amount of ammo needed and any mission specific equipment.
4. CONDUCT COORDINATION
a. Contact other friendly forces and/or representatives of other support units. If
practical and possible, check to ensure adjacent units and friendly patrols are told of
your route, objective and general plan of operation. This will help avoid accidental
exchanges of "friendly" fire and resultant casualties.
5. Make reconnaissance
a. Ground
b. Air
c. Map
d. Photo
e. Previous Patrol Reports
6. COMPLETE PLAN
a. Think over possible "Murphy Factors" and check them against existing contingency
plans. If there is time make a rough sand model of the terrain for checking your
plan. Include provision for care of the wounded. Consider assembly points. Make
notes for Operations Order.
7. ISSUE PATROL or OPERATIONS ORDER
The patrol leader gives a terrain orientation to the assembled troops, then the
mission instructions.
8. EXECUTION
a. Rehearsal.....For a night patrol, rehearse once in daylight and once at night. Place
emphasis on each individual knowing: the plan, the route assembly point, what to do
upon enemy contact, what to do at the mission objective. Review how to orient on
particular terrain features, by compass, by the stars, and know and when to fire their
weapons at night.
b. Inspect the patrol.....Are all faces and equipment camoflauged? Are all sleeves
and pant legs taped or strapped? Is there anything shiny showing? Check every
canteen to ensure they are full. Have each man jump up and down to check for
rattles or sloshing. Are fresh batteries in all radios and flashlights? Are all radios
tuned to the proper channel? Check all compasses for accuracy. Synchronize all
watches. Make sure all equipment is complete and in working order.
c. Conduct the Patrol / Mission
Get there...get n...get the job done...get out...get back!
d. Mission Report
Report the percentage of completion, observed effects of mission on enemy, Verify
the accuracy of all previous recon data with personal observations. Share any new
information with senior officers, and if need, with friendly forces in the area, with
special emphasis on debrief by your own Intel officer.
SMEAC: The Five Paragraph Warning Order
General
The Warning Order is to inform the patrol members of an impending mission and to
organize their preparation for it. The format outlined below covers the information
necessary for a warning order. The detail covered in each section is determined by
the Team Leader to insure proper coverage.
S-Situation-Friendly and enemy- what are they doing?
M-Mission-What is it? Describe it's goals and purpose. Include who, what, when and
where.
E-Execution-Who does what and when? Location of Rally Points?
A-Admin. and Logistics- Needed equipment for conduct of mission, and dispersal
among team.
C-Command and signal-Chain of command? Radio freqs and call signs for your team
and nearby friendlies? Sign/Countersign?
Additional Notes:
1. Reconnoiter, pinpoint objective/enemy position/obstacles.
2. Determine weak points: designate support positions.
3. Assign objectives-identify the decisive point.
4. Determine main attack, supporting attack and reserve.
5. Assign breach, support and assault missions.
6. Designate fire control measures.
7. Coordinate direct/indirect fire to time of attack.
8. Control measures during attack.
9. Secure ground and air
10. Coordinate and reorganize.
OPERATIONS ORDER
1. Situation
a. Enemy Forces
_(1) Weather
_(2) Terrain
_(3) Identification
_(4) Location
_(5) Activity
_(6) Strength
_(7) Probable course of action
b. Friendly Forces
_(1) Mission of next higher unit
_(2) Location and planned action of units on left, right, front and rear
_(3) Mission and routes of adjacent patrols
_(4) Units providing fire support
2. MISSION: Who, What, When, Where, Why?
3. Execution
a. Concept of Operation
_(1) Scheme of maneuver
_(2) Fire Support (Type and Priority)
b. Mission of Subordinate Elements. (Who, What, When, Where, Why)
_(1) Squads/Teams
_(2) Special Teams and key individuals
c. Coordinating Instructions
_(1) Action at the objective (Include sketch)
_(2) Time of departure and return
_(3) Movement techniques
_(4) Route
_(5 Alternate Route
_(6) Departure/re-entry of friendly positions
(a) Departure
(b) Re-entry
_(7) Rally points and actions at RP's
_(Cool Actions on enemy contact
_(9) Actions at danger areas
_(10) Actions at halts
_(11) Fire support
_(12) Rehearsals
_(13) Inspection
_(14) Debriefing
4. Service Support
a. Rations
b. Arms and ammo
c. Uniform and equipment each will carry
d. Method of handling dead and wounded
e. Prisoners and captured equipment
5. Command and Signal
a. Signal
_(1) Frequencies and call signs
(a) Within the patrol
(b) With HQ and other units
_(2) Pyrotechnics and hand signals
_(3) Challenge and password
(a) Regular
(b) Forward
(c) Running
(d) Codewords and reports
(b) Command
_(1) Chain of Command
_(2) Location of Squad leader during movement and at objective
Target Acquisition and Analysis
Targets are selected according to six factors known as CARVER.
C-Criticality-How important is the target to the enemy?
A-Accessibility-How easy is it to get to?
R-Recognizability-How easy is the target to recognize?
V-Vulnerability-How vulnerable is the target
E-Effects-What effect will the attack have on enemy operations?
R-Recuperability-How easy will it be for the enemy to repair/replace the target?
Principles of Security:
1. Dispersion--Avoid large concentrations of forces.
2. Mobility--Be prepared to move at all times. Equipment should be prepared in one
man loads. Equipment which can't be carried must be cached. The area around the
patrol base must be policed often.
3. Use Cover and Deception to confuse the enemy about:
* Your location
* Your troop strength, status, and equipment.
* Your intentions
* The time and place of planned operations.
* What you know about him
* How successful his operations have been.
* How good his intelligence is.
4.. Deny the enemy discernable patterns and signatures that tell him what you will
do.
5. Safeguard all plans and records. Keep records to an absolute minimum, release
information on a need to know basis, restrict the amount of information given to
individuals who are exposed to capture, destroy outdated records, encode and
encrypt all messages.
6. Other security measures:
* Make sure all personnel and equipment are well camoflauged.
* Keep units isolated from each other.
* Keep campsites clean
* Know where your people are going and how they will get there.
* Train in resistance to interrogation.
MARCH SECURITY
1. Know enemy's location and strength.
2. Select and brief units on primary, alternate and emergency routes.
3. Use local population to obtain the latest information o the enemy.
4. Place security elements in front, rear, and both flanks.
5.. Screen bivouac site thoroughly.
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NMS section 8 (12/1/03)

Post by Nick on Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:49 pm

© 2001, 2003 awrm.org All Rights Reserved.
37
NATIONAL MILITIA STANDARDS
www.awrm.org
8.0 COMMUNICATIONS S.O.I.
8.1 Training Standards
Mission success depends on the unit commanders ability to concentrate superior fire
power at citical times and places. The key to this success is superiority in command
and control via communications. Effective commo is essential to both the survival
and the combat readiness of all units.
To be competant in the field under adverse operating conditions, all Signal Corps
personnel must meet the following MilComm training standards.
Team Radio Operator (TRO) Profile
The TRO will carry, operate and maintain the teams radio equipment. He must have
a thorough understanding of it's potential as well as it's limitations and how to
overcome them. He will aid the Team Leader by maintaining contact with the other
teams in the field and / or the Base Command Structure. The TRO will train and
become profecient in:
1. Basic Operating Procedures
2. COMSEC
3. Basic Signal Intelligance gathering
4. Digital Encryption System
5. SitRep / SALUTE S.O.P
6. Alert S.O.P.
7. Unit CEOI
8. Construction of covert, field expediant antennas
Communications Officer Profile
Is responsible to his unit's Command Staff for the creation and implementation of
communications systems and protocals within his respective Area of Operations. The
CommO will create, implement, and oversee the Rapid Alert System. He will see to it
that a secure system of communications is implemented and will be in charge of all
communications protocals, codes etc. He will coordinate his efforts with his
respective Intelligance Officer and his Commander. He will create and oversee the
SigInt network. The CommO will be the Net Control Operator (NCO) for his A/O and
will be an integral part of the Regional (Batn) and State Comm Network.
The Communcations Officer must be trained to the following Militia Signal Corps
standards in addition to those of the TRO:
1. Must have a thorough knowledge of Signal Corps organization on both the Tactical
and Strategic level.
2. Must be profeciant in Net Control Station (NCS) operating procedures; And, meet
the minimum equipment requirments to fulfill his assigned mission.
3. Must be profeciant in PSK-31 ops
4. Must be able to send and receive morse code
5. Must have a thorough working knowledge of all MilComm coding systems and
protocals.
6. Must be abe to develope and implement a battalion level (regional) Rapid Alert
© 2001, 2003 awrm.org All Rights Reserved.
38
System for integratng communications with local units and teams in the field.
7. Must be trained and equiped to maintain contact with Regional, State and national
comm networks.
8. Must be profeciant in and equipped to gather Signal Intelligance (SigInt) and to
coordinate those activities with the his units Intell Officer and C/O.
8.2 SIGNAL CORPS ORGANIZATION
Purpose And Overwiew
Presently, it appears to many people that there exists an immediate necessity to set
up a system of national communications which encompasses support for local and
regional communications sub-systems. The objective is to be able to readily
disseminate communications deemed to be of emergency nature.
Obstacles
Although there are logistical and economic concerns, security is the main obstacle to
overcome in establishing a national and regional communications system for use by
the established local units.
Definitions
For puposes of defining terms used herein, the following words, terms, or phrases
shall have the following meanings:
Division - as used herein the term Division is synonomous with region.
Region - as used herein the term region means the pre-determined extent of the
area of operations of any local unit or Division. Regions/Divisions are established by
state Militias.
AO - means Area of Operations.
Equipment - means radio communications devices.
Comm Section - means radio stations established for relay of sit-reps between
Militias.
Proposed System: Integrated networks
1. Local Units - If organized by Militia Divisions within a state, all participating Local
Units would have the capability to initiate sit-reps to their respective Division Comm
section, by means of the equipment available in those Local Units, otherwise, Local
Units would communicate directly with established state Comm sections for in their
respective AO.
2. Division Comm - If organized by Militia Divisions within a state, Division Comm
sections would subsequently make sit-reps based on sit-rep information received
from Local Units to established state-wide Comm stations by the means of the
equipment in their respective Division Comm sections, otherwise the state comm
sections would receive local sit-reps.
a. As Division Comm sections receive and relay sit-reps from Local Units to state
Comm sections, Division Comm sections would of necessity be required to have a
broad range of equipment . A system of standardization would narrow the range of
equipment required by both Local Units and Division Comm sections, thus enhancing
economic concerns by reducing the broad range of differnt types of equipment
necessary to meet the needs of receiving Local Unit sit-reps while shifting the
emphasis upon use of codes and/or encryption means.
3. State Comm - Within each state there should be a minimum of 3, maximum of 24,
relay stations operating on a 24/7 basis, capable of receiving sit-reps from all
Divisions within state geographical area and subsequently passing sit-rep to ERPN at
regularly scheduled time of transmission, or, during emergency to a designated
national Comm section.
a. State Comm relay stations operating on a 24/7 basis are necessary for purposes
of handling emergency traffic from Division and Local Units, passing that traffic along
to a national communications section for processing and re-distribution. (NOTE: A
working example of how such a system could be applied can be observed by
monitoring what is called "MidCARS" on 7.258 MHz. "MidCARS" is an mid-America
regional Amateur Radio Service which passes traffic along to any stations checking
into that net. Numerous stations act as Net Control operators and pass along and
periodically transfer Net Control operations along to another station to assume Net
Control operations, usually hourly. If a full compliment of 24 state control operators
were established in each state, each operator would serve as Net Control for 1 hour.)
b. It should only be necessary for one state relay station to pass traffic to ERPN
during regularly scheduled Net operations. The then current operating state Net
Control station would pass sit-rep traffic to ERPN. Dependent upon the number state
relay stations acting as Net Control a rotational schedule could be assigned to the
participating state Net Control Comm. section.
c. State Comm stations would be required to have available at that station a broad
range of communications equipment for passing traffic between Local Units, Division
Comm. sections, and ERPN.
The foregoing would require several means of communications hardware and
software, (i.e. voice, analog, digital) be available for receiving and sending traffic
within the various Division and state levels. This would provide to local units the
means to monitor traffic between Division, state, and national communications
stations dependent upon individual local units equipment availability.
Participating Local Units can issue sit-reps other Local Units, Division and/or state
Comm sections, dependent upon state Militia structure, using designated "public" sitrep
frequencies and/or alternate sit-rep frequencies which are monitored 24/7.
Normal sit-reps or emergency sit-reps will be relayed according to established SOP's
which control use of net operations, and which shall, in case of emergency situation,
allocate sit-rep frequencies, tac-frequencies and callsign designation, and any other
pertinent tactical information.
8.3 TACTICAL COMMO 101
Communications is equally as important to your survival as planning and
organization. During a disaster all forms of communications in current use may fail or
be shut down by the government. Every group must set up a reliable means of
commo in advance that is totally independent of outside control or power sources.
Commanders who fail to implement tactical networks and comm plans will be unable
to command, control or coordinate thier forces. They will be deaf, dumb and blind
during a crisis.
Tactical Comm. Defined
Tactical communications are short range, ground-wave (line of sight) commo used in
your Area of Operations between team members, teams, squads and thier firebase
or command center. Tac Com also includes the Local and Regional networks. Local is
for the Rapid Alert System within your county. Regional is the counties surrounding
your A/O.
Range of Operations
Normal range may be considered .5-5 miles for team to team commo, 5-15 miles for
team to base communications and up to 50+ miles for base to base commo.
Purpose
Area Commanders use Tactical Communication to direct fire and movement, call for
resupply, reinforcement, medevac etc., operate the local Rapid Alert System and to
maintain contact with other units in surrounding counties.
Tactical Networks
Consist of 3 base radio stations per county, equiped for SSB/Encrypted PSK-31
operation; plus mobile radios in EVERY vehicle. These base stations provide commo
between the base of operations and the teams deployed in the field. They will also
act as relay stations between the differant A/Os within the region. They will remain
operational on a 24 hour basis during a crisis or when the teams are deployed. They
will monitor all unit freqs and gather SigInt from enemy communications. They must
be able to receive and transmit over long distance using self contained power
sources.
C.E.O.I.
Communications Equipment Operating Instructions- C.E.O.I-are contained in a small
laminated notebook and are to be carried by all comm personnel. Every tactical
network and team must have this to avod confusion and to maintain OPSEC.
The CEOI contains: 7 split-frequency pairs to be used on a rotational basis, net/tac
callsigns with an autheticator keyset, codes in use for the net and units during an
activity, operation or period of time, and other instructions as needed. Codes are
randomely chosen letter number groups of varying length (may resemble the 10-
code) Different codes are used for the same thing. All codes and frequencys must be
changed often, even daily.
*NOTE* For detailed information about Communication Security procedures study:
CommSec hXXp://155.217.58.58/cgi-bin/atdl.dll/fm/24-12/Ch7.htm
Equipment
Tactical comm equipment must be lightwieght, portable and have sufficient range to
maintain contact with all team members and the base of operations. It must also be
compatable with the base station equipment in use.
Band and Equipment Overview
Several bands and modes are available that will meet the above criteria. UHF-High
Band / VHF-Low Band and the Freeband.
UHF-High Band
UHF is strictly limited range, line of sight communications better suited for the urban
environment. UHF signals penetrate buildings and metal clutter well, but the signal is
attenuated or absorbed by dense folliage and heavy terrain.
FRS: Most groups are familiar with or use Family Radio Service equipment. FRS has
14 UHF channels, a maximum output of .5 watt, a fixed (non-removeable antenna)
and a very limited real world range of about 1.5 miles.
FRS radios only use is for clear, simple to use communications within a team. They
have very limted range, No privacy and being FM are very easily DF-ed. The so
called "privacy codes" aren't. All they do is limit YOUR ability to hear others on the
same freq. near you. Also, don't waste your money on encrypted units. Most use
simple speech inversion circuitry which will confuse the basic moron; but wont slow
down a smart 12 year old with access to common gear laying around the house. If
"da man" is within range...encryption ain't gonna help you anyway.
GMRS: A better UHF solution for urban ops is the General Mobile Radio Service.
GMRS has 23 FM channels (7 of which are compatable with FRS). The first 8
channels are for base/mobile/HT simplex use: 462.550, .575, .600, .625, .650, .675
(Emergency Channel), .700, and .725. There are 8 freqs. in the 467.000 mhz band
that are for repeater input use only. Next, there are 7 interstitial channels located
between the regular GMRS freqs. that are compatable with the first 7 FRS freqs.
These are: 462.5625, .5875, 6125, .6375, .6625, .6875 and .7125.
Equipment is available with up to 50 watts output for up to 25 mile range. Most HT's
have 15 channels with a 2 watt output. Range is approximately 5 miles. Midland
currently offers a mil. spec. HT with all 23 channels and 2 watts erp. Other
companies are offering HTs with up to 5 watts erp, 15 channels plus NOAA weather
scan. Prices are around $150.
For increased range, All of these HT's can be upgraded with 1/2 wave 2.5 db gain
whip antennas. For mobile operation, mag mount antennas are available with up to 5
db gain.
To set up a GMRS network for your AO that has approx. 6-15 mile coverage; take a
5 watt HT with a speaker mike and connect it to an outdoor antenna mounted 20-30
feet high. Use the best low loss 50 ohm coax you can find such as LMR-400. Keep
the cable run 50 feet or less. For general coverage in all directions use a
omnidirectional vertical such as a J-pole or one of the readily available commercial
antennas. To increase your range further, and for a little more comsec, take a 10db
gain 440mhz 4-element beam, cut it down for 1.1 swr on the GMRS band and turn it
with a tv rotor. You could also build this antenna out of rigid copper pipe for almost
nothing.
*NOTE*
The FCC demands that you pay a $75 tax (liscense) to operate on GMRS. They
readily admit that the purpose of the tax is to "catch scofflaws" who owe child
support or the IRS. Due to the short range nature of GMRS, enforcement of the rules
has been rather lax. Anyone can buy a GMRS rig and most are tossing the paperwork
in the trash. No one will check to see if you have a liscense unless you interfer with
another liscensed operator. So, NEVER interfer with a frequency when it is in use or
another operator.
Also, the FCC issues a callsign with each new liscense. It is a 3 by 4 call that should
be very familiar to the old Class D CB operators. A GMRS call will look like this: KFW-
1234. So, if you don't have a call...make one up.
BE aware that the FRS/GMRS frequencys are in the same band used by local, State
and Federal law enforement agencys and that they can monitor your commo in split
second.
VHF-Low Band
Heres where it starts to get interesting. VHF Low Band is preferred in rugged terrain
beause LB signals are much less affected by hills or dense folliage than VHF (2-
meter) or UHF. This is probably the reason why the military uses tac comm radios
that operate from 30.000-87.975mhz.
6-Meter Low Band (50.-54.000mhz) is well suited for tac com operations at the local
and regional level. In most areas of the country this band sees little use and has
been all but forgotten by the Tech class hams who think that 2 meters is the only
band. There is little interferance or overcrowding.
Typical mobile range is 40-50 miles. During years of high sun spot activity,
occasional band openings allow base stations running beam antennas and power to
reach out several hundred miles.
HT's for this band operate in the FM mode with an output of 5 watts. This is plenty of
power for 5-15 mile range. Field expediant antennas for 6 meters are small, easily
made and will increase the range even further. Mobile rigs such as the Ranger 5054
will operate CW, SSB or FM with 25 watts output. Most of the 6 meter HT's and
mobile rigs can be broadbanded to cover the military frequencys which has many
advantages. Quarter wave mobile whip antennas are approx. 4.5 feet tall and cost
about $25.
ARRL 6-Meter (50-54mhz) Bandplan:
50.000-50.100 CW, beacons
50.100-50.300 SSB, CW
...50.100-50.125 DX suband
...50.125 Old DX SSB Call
...50.200 New DX SSB Call
50.300-50.600 All Modes
...50.400 AM Call
50.600-50.800 Digital
...50.620 Packett Call
51.000-51.100 West Coast DX
*NOTE*
All freq.s above 51.10 are spaced 20 kHz apart on "even" channels.
51.500-51.600 Simplex (6 channels)
51.120-51.480 Repeater Input (19 channels)
51.620-51.980 Repeater Output (19 channels)
52.000-52.480 Repeater Input (23 channels except...)
..52.0-52.04 FM SIMPLEX
52.500-52.980 Repeater Output (23 channels except)
..52.525 PRIMARY FM SIMPLEX
..52.540 SECONDARY FM SIMPLEX
53.000-53.480 Repeater Input (19 channels)
..53.000 BASE FM SIMPLEX
..53.020 Simplex
53.520-53.980 FM Simplex
Upper HF 12-11-10 Meters
Being at the upper end of the High Freq. scale; these bands offer long range
nationwide commo during daytime band openings and have excellant propagation in
hilly, forrested terrain. Groundwave signals will cover 60+ miles base to base, 24
hours a day. During band opening ranges of thousands of miles are possible. First
Europe and the North will come in then as the day advances, Latin America, the
Pacific West and Austailia. These bands usually open about 1 hour after sunrise and
stay up until around 9 pm local at night. A 25 watt, broadbanded mobile rig, such as
the Ranger 2950DX or the old Uniden HR-2510 coupled to a 102 inch steel whip will
have a range of approx. 35-40 miles. The mobile rig will work well for a 40-60 mile
coverage base station with a power supply, set of meters/tuner and a vertical 5/8's
wave antenna mounted 36' high. For a little more stealth and increased range, use a
3 element horizontal beam, a tv rotor and 40' mast. Most hams operate in USB mode
on these bands while the freebanders tend to use LSB.
ARRL 10-Meter Bandplan:
28.000-28.070-CW
28.070-28.150-CW/Data
28.120-28.189-Packett/Data/CW
28.190-28.300-CW/Beacons
28.300-28.500-Most SSB activity
28.500-29.699-SSB and FM
28.590-ARRL Emergency Net
28.680-SSTV
29.300-29.510-Satellites
29.510-29.590-Repeater Inputs
29.600-National FM Simplex Freq.
29.610-29.690-Repeater Output (Base)
Freeband-27.405-27.995 (Upper Band)
27.500 National MilComm Monitor
27.555 National DX Call Freq.
11-Meter-26.965-27.405 (CB)
27.385LSB-Ch.38-National Contact Freq.
Freeband-25.000-26.960 (Low Band)
12 Meter-24.890-24.990
24.890-24.930-CW/Data
24.930-24.990-USB
Militia Signal Corps Tactical Bandplan
The following simplex frequencies are for Initial Contact only. Use them to contact
friendly forces when you are out of your area of operations. Do not use these freq's
for any mission critical information. When calling for a militia contact on these freqs:
Call "CQ for the MSC DX group". All groups nationwide are urged to monitor these
freq.s 24/7.
Tac1 27.325 AM/LSB-Alternate Call (Channel 32)
Tac2 27.385LSB-Primary Local Call (Channel 38)
Tac3 27.555LSB Primary DX Call
Tac4 29.600FM Simplex Call
Tac5 52.525FM Simplex Primary Call
Tac6 52.040FM Simplex Alternate Call
Tac7 146.485FM Simplex Call
Tac8 146.520FM Simplex Call
Tac9 462.6125FM (channel 3 FRS)
MINIMUM EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS:
1 FRS/GMRS radio and spare batteries per team member.
Team Radio Operators Field Gear:
*1 Gear bag
*1 GMRS Radio with hi-gain whip antenna per team, 2 per squad
*1 200 channel scanner;
*NOTE-Option* The Yaesu VX-5r HT can replace all squad radios as well as do double
duty as a scanner. It will give you the ability to TRX on 6 & 2 meter, 70cm (440)
FRS/GMRS, MURS and many other freq's. It can also monitor HF shortwave as well
as military, aircraft and all local, State and Federal agency freq.s
*1 Headset w/boom mike for radios
*2 Red light sticks and/or mag-lite with red filter
*1 C.E.O.I on laminated 3"X5" cards
*1 Notepad w/pencil
*1 Topo map of teams Area of Operation
*1 Mini-binoculars 12X25
*1 Manpack rechargeable battery system (7ah with various connectors to adopt to all
squad equipment)
For further information study:
Tactical Single Channel Radio Comm Techniques study:
hXXp://155.217.58.58/cgi-bin/atdl.dll/fm/24-18.htm
Also, study the Milcomm Organization, and Rapid Alert System threads in the comm
forum.
For those who know nothing about tactical communications read:
Basic Tac-Comm
hXXp://www.netside.com/~lcoble/dir9/commo.htm
8.4 RAPID ALERT SYSTEM
Purpose
All local, state and national units need to implement, maintain and regularly test a
Rapid Alert System so that all members may be notified about any emergency
situation.
The R.A.S. consists of five elements:
1. An Emergency Deployment Plan; which will consist of rendevous/rally points,
persons you are to report to and specific member assignments during the
emergency.
2. Telephone Tree: Each member must have a contact list of other members to call
or page. This contact list should include all members of your Local Unit, as well as
your State Commander, XO and Communications Officer. The phone tree will be used
to notify all members, of the activization of the Communications Network and their
units mobilization. (see SOP)
3. E-Mail: For issuing SITREPS, SALUTE reports, announcements etc. All sensitive or
mission critical information should be encrypted by the most secure means available.
At the present time use: the Communications forum at awrm.org for information that
is for dessimination to the "public" and the Comm. Officers forum for more critical
comm.
4. Radio Networks: Are radio stations grouped together for the purpose of message
handling, relaying SitReps, and for the Command Staffs use in coordination and
focus of effort. (see Organizational Overview by 1371)
Local Nets should consist of at least 3 radio stations per county that are capable of
contact with each other as well as with the teams in the field. At least 1 of these
stations must be capable of contact with all surrounding countys and the nearest
Regional Net Control Station.
Regional Nets are comprised of several countys grouped together for mutual support.
These Regional Nets will form the State Network. At least 3 regional stations must be
capable of maintaing contact throughout their respective state as well as being able
to contact the National (ERPN) Network. The most capable station in this state
network will be designated the State Net Control Station. It must be capable of
maintainng Local, Statewide and Nationwide contact at all times.
5. Neighborhood Alerts: Members will be designated to ride through the local
neighborhood alerting the people in their Area of Operations. A siren, bell, and or
p.a. system may also be used.
Activization of the R.A.S.
The Local RAS may be activated by any member of the particular unit involved. But,
every effort must be made to follow the chain of command, especially at the
Regional and State level.
Any time the State RAS is activated it should be called by the C/O, X/O, or Comm. O.
and only after confirmation of the local sitreps with the Local C/O. If the crisis is of a
Statewide nature it should then be passed on to the national level by the State Net
Control Station.
Telephone Tree S.O.P.
Summary:
1. C/O notifies Team Leaders
2. Team Leaders notify team members
3. Team Leaders report status back to C/O
Detailed Procedure:
1. Notify Team Leaders: The decision to activate the telephone tree is made by the
C/O, X/O or other Command Staff. They will contact the TEAM Leaders and advise
them of:
a. THE NATURE OF THE EMERGENCY
b. Any special instructions
c. The telephone number and or frequency where TL's can report back the status of
their teams to the C/O. If any TL's can't be reached backups will be called.
2. Notify Team Members:
a. Each Team Leader will then notify all the individal members of his team; advising
them of:
a. The nature of the emergency
b. Any special instructions
c. Requistes them to monitor the ERPN, their State Net and the Local Emergency
Frequency for further instructions and SitReps.
Alert Levels
Over the years we've saw every kind of alert imaginable. Most of them false or
someone jumping the gun. These "alerts" usually come with no confirmation or
follow up; meanwhile everyone runs around for 2 days trying to find out what is
going on.
Only State Commanding Officers or State Communications Officers should issue an
alert. Local groups should maintain contact with these officers and issue sitreps as
necessary up the chain of command to them. Only upon double-confirmation and a
decision by the State C/O, should local sitreps be passed on or an alert issued. A
standardized SOP or Protocol for Sitreps and Alert Levels should be adopted.
ALERT LEVELS:
Level 1 "RED" Highest alert rating. Incident In Progress: Nationwide Comm. Network
in operation and monitored 24/7. Local and State Nets activated. Emergency
Deployment Plan activated and All units mobilized.
Level 2 "YELLOW" Credible Threat: Rapid Alert System activated and all Local, State
and Nationwide nets in "open mode" operation 24/7. All units at preassigned
locations and awaiting further orders.
Level 3 Potential Threat: All equipment packed and ready to go. All members stay in
daily contact with Team Leaders via the Local Radio Network. Local Nets make
weekly contact with the State Net. Monitor ERPN on schedule.
Level 4 Minimal Threat: All equipment available. Members maintain standard contact
with Team Leaders through the weekly Local Radio Net.
Level 5 Standby...All members monitor shortwave, ERPN and local freqs. for
developing situations.
Message Format
CALL...Give callsign of the station you are attempting to contact. Then, your callsign.
After the Net Control Station acknowledges you may proceed with your message.
Transmit information in the following order:
PRECEDANCE---Routine, Priority or Emergency
TIME---Followed by date-time group IE: 012302-1830
FROM---Followed by callsign of person sending message if different from that of the
sender.
TO...The person or unit the message is for
..."BREAK"
Text of message---Encode and limit to 25 words if possible. Use the D.E.S., Brevity
Code, SitRep and Salute format per MilComm SOP.
8.4 SRATCOMM And TACOMM S.O.I.
National Communications S.O.I.
PURPOSE:
The National Network's mission is to provide emergency communications for the
various states by acting as points of contact and relay stations. OPSEC and COMSEC
apply at all times.
The Eastern Regional Patriots Net is a directed net for SITREPS, SALUTE's, message
handing/relay and announcements. We need reports and updates on natural or man
made disasters, civil distress / unrest, police militarization, Posse Comitatus Act
violations, military activities in civilian areas, FEMA actions against citizens, FBI/ATF
action in local jurisdications, LE/Military roadblocks and checkpoints, martial law
declarations, weapons confiscations etc.
TIME:
All times given are in UTC. Monitor the appropriate frequencies per SOI, on the hour,
from five minutes before untill five minutes after.
COMSEC:
These frequencys are "public" knowledge, therefore no Mission Critical traffic should
be passed. Use all COMSEC measures including the Milita Brevity Code. Be prepared
to hit and bounce at ALL times.
FREQUENCIES:
Don't give out frequencys over the air Use the "F" or "A" code.
National Emergency Net:
F-1__3.860-LSB-Nightime Monitor / Eastern Regional Patriot Net Meets Every night
@ 0100 hour
F-2__7.275-LSB-Net-Primary Daytime Monitor
F-3_10.145-LSB Digital Net 11:00/13:00/14:00/ and 17:00 hours..Call for KC2AXU-
15NPS(National Patriot System) Use mailbox if NCS is not online...leave your id and
a brief message...use the Brevity Code
F-4_14.345-USB-Alternate Daytime Monitor
F-5_18.140-USB-Alternate Daytime Monitor
F-6_27.555-Daytime Monitor/DX Initial Contact
F-7_28.333-USB-ConSigCor
"Tac Call" Initial Contact Bandplan:
The following simplex frequencies are for initial contact only. Do not use them to
pass any mission critical information. Use them to contact friendly forces when you
are out of your area of operations. When attempting to make contact with the
militia; Call "CQ for MSC DX group". All units should monitor these freqs. 24/7.
Tac1 27.325 AM/SSB Alternate
Tac2 27.385 LSB Primary Local Contact Freq.
Tac3 27.555 LSB Primary Nationwide DX Daytime Call Freq.
Tac4 29.600 FM
Tac5 52.025 FM Primary
Tac6 52.040 FM Alternate
Tac7 146.485 FM Primary
Tac8 146.520 FM Alternate
Tac9 462.6125 FM (channel 3 FRS)
*6.900* Emergency Broadcast System: Monitor on the hour during emergency for
news and announcements.
*NOTE:
Complete details on the above subjects can be found in the Signal Corps Operations
Manual, which is a seperate publication.
For more information, have your CO, XO, or Comms Officer check the
Communications section of www.awrm.org.
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NMS section 9 (12/1/03)

Post by Nick on Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:51 pm

© 2001, 2003 awrm.org All Rights Reserved.
49
NATIONAL MILITIA STANDARDS
www.awrm.org
9.0 FIELD MEDICS GUIDE
Team Medics Bag:
The following information was taken from the book "Plain Talk Medicine for Uncertain
Times and Places by the "y2k Doc" It is recommended that everyone stock the
following items to be prepared for emergency or disaster.
BASIC Over the counter MEDICINES:
Benadryl (generic) 30 pills - 2 boxes
Benadryl liquid (generic) 4 oz. - 8 vials
Afrin nose spray (generic) - 2 vials
Normal saline nose spray - 2 vials
Sudafed (generic) - 96 pills
Pediacare (generic) - 4 vials
Miconazole 7 - 5 boxes
Lotrimin Cream (generic) 30 gm tube
Advil (generic) 200mg 1,000 pills
Tylenol (generic) 500mg 1000 pills
Naphcon A - 2 vials
Eye irrigating solution 4 oz - 3 vials
Saline solution (homemade)
500 Aspirin
Imodium AD (generic) 24 pills - 2 boxes
Cimetidine 200mg 60 pills - 2 boxes
Rolaids (generic) 150 tabs - 2 bottles
For sore throat/colds: Honey, lemon, zinc, vitamin C and echinacia
POISON ANTIDOTES:
Ipecac Syrup
Activated Charcoal (25 gm per bottle)
WOUND CARE:
Hydrogen peroxide - 2 quarts
Providone/iodine - 1 pint
Rubbing alcohol - 1 quart
Generic Neosporin X 4 tubes
Bacitracin X 1 tube
Band-Aids 3 boxes of 50
Butterfly bandages 4 boxes of 10
Knuckle and fingertip band- aids 20 per box
Sterile 4X4 gauze pads 25 - 4 boxes
Non-sterile 4X4 gauze pads 24 per box - 2 boxes
Sterile non stick pads such as Telfa - 2 boxes
Kerlix 4 yd roll 4.5" wide - 4 rolls
Kling 3.6 yd roll 3 inches wide 5 rolls to a box - 2 boxes
Surgipad dressing 5" X 9" X 12
Cloth adhesive tape 1" 10yds - 4 rolls
Ctoth adhesive tape 3" 1 yds X 2 rolls
BASIC ORTHOPEDICS:
Ace wraps 3" X 4
Ace wraps 4" X 2
Ace wraps 6" X 2
Sam's splint X 3
Crutches
SUPPLIES:
Ear wax removal kit
Stethoscope
Blood pressure cuff
Otoscope with ear specula
Flashlight
5cc syringes for ORS rehydration
ADVANCED FIRST AID:
Suture Kits
Nylon Sutures
Dental Kits with forceps
IV Rehydration Kits
Sterile gloves
Recommended Medicines:
Primary Antibiotics:
Trimethoprim/Sulfa DS 28 pills = 14 days
Doxycyclene 100mg 28 pills = 14 days
Erythromycin 500mg 42 pills = 14 days
Cephalexin 500mg 56 pills = 14 days
Secondary Antibiotics:
Metronidazole 500mg 42 pills = 14 days
Mebendazole 100mg 3 pills = 3 days
Gentamicin Eye Drops 5 ml
Neo/Poly HCT ear drops
Broad Spectrum Antibiotics:
Zithromax 250mg - 6 pills = 5 days
Trovan 200mg 14 pills = 14 days
Local Anesthetic:
Lidocaine 1% w/ epinephrine
Marcaine 0.25% w/ epi
Side Effect Medication:
Prednisone 20mg 30 pills
Promethazine 25mg 30 pills
Recommended Medical Manuals:
The American Red Cross First Aid and Safety Handbook
The AMA Family Medical Guide
The Merck Manual
The PDR Pocket Guide to Prescription Drugs
Where There is No Doctor
Ditch Medicine: Advanced Field Procedures for Emergencies
Decontamination:
Either you prepare for bio war or you die if you get hit. Everyone should stock the
basic supplies on this list.
1. Plastic garden sprayer-2 gallon
2. Chlorine bleach-6 gallons minimum
3. Filter masks-2 per person
4. Rubbing alcohol- 1 gallon minimum
5. Oil-based soap (Fels Napha 12 bars minimum)
6. Iodine shampoo (anti-bacterial) 1 per person
7. Epinephrine 1:1000 (10 cc vial) 1 per person
8. OxyTet-50
9. Combiotic (100 ml) 1 per person
10. Tetracycline (100 ml) 1 per person
11. Cipro
12. Neosynephrine 1 per person
13. Sevin dust, Rotenone, and other insecticides
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NMS section 10 (12/1/03)

Post by Nick on Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:51 pm

© 2001, 2003 awrm.org All Rights Reserved.
52
NATIONAL MILITIA STANDARDS
www.awrm.org
10.0 EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
Home Supplies:
Emergencies such as natural or manmade disasters, a declaration of martial law, a
terrorist event or foreign invasion etc. could disrupt your ability to travel, procure
food, medical and fuel supplies and disrupt communications and utility services.
Without proper planning for these events and the acquisition and storage of essential
supplies you will be at the mercy of the elements or the oppressor.
It is imperative that EVERY militia member and his family prepare to survive totally
off the grid with no outside assistance for periods of up to a year. Do not be
discouraged or overwhelmed by this idea. Begin by cutting expenses. Make a bare
bones budget and stick to it. Get out of debt ASAP. Sell off unnecessary items and
junk for extra cash. Build a nest egg of hard currency. You should maintain at least a
3 month emergency cash reserve to cover ALL living expenses. Plant a garden and
can food. Buy staples in bulk. Go for group purchases. Build your essential supplies
one step at a time. Start with the basic home supplies; most of which you probably
already have scattered around the house. Organize these supplies in a storage room
or area. Make sure each family member has a 72 hour Bug Out Bag packed and
ready in case you have to evacuate in a hurry. Keep a 72 hour emergency kit packed
in each vehicle and be sure all vehicles gas tanks are kept full at all times Keep spare
5 gallon cans for each vehicle.
BASIC EMERGENCY SUPPLY LIST:
1 Dual fuel Coleman stove
1 Dual fuel lantern with spare mantles and pump
6 Gallons stove fuel
25 Gallons kerosene
2 kerosene lanterns or lamps with spare wicks
1 kerosene heater or woodstove
$5 kitchen matches
1 or more large ABC fire extinguishers
1 non electric can opener
2 large plastic wash pans, 1 cast iron skillet, 1 large pot with lid and handle, 1
butcher knife ! meat cleaver
2 buckets and 1 washtub
1 Case (24 rolls) toilet paper
24 Bars of antibacterial soap
1 Windup clock
1 Thermometer / Barometer
1 sleeping bag per person
1 belt knife per person
1 good flashlight and spare batteries per person
1-2 boxes of large heavy duty garbage bags
1 roll 4 mil. plastic
several rolls duct tape and electrical tape
6 gallon unscented bleach
2 gallon white vinegar
Several large rat traps, steel traps, snares etc.
Fishing pole, hooks, sinkers etc.
1 large roll barb wire
1 Scanner
1 Shortwave or Ham radio
1 Sideband CB
1 Deep cycle marine battery
1 30 watt solar panel
BASIC TOOL KIT
...hammer, pliers, screwdrivers, crescent and pipe wrenches, handsaw and drill, crow
bar, shovel, pick mattock, axe, maul and wedge, chainsaw w/spare chain, plug and
12 cans of oil
WATER SUPPLY:
Water is THE most essential resource everyone must have. Without it, you can die in
3 - 5 days. If it's contaminated it can cause many deadly diseases such as diarrhea,
cholera, dysentery etc. During a disaster water from public utilities may be
contaminated or unavailable. You must be prepared to decontaminate whatever
water source is on hand. Furthermore you must be able to store adequate supplies of
water for drinking, cooking and washing. Many books claim 1-2 gallons per person
per day is adequate; but, 5 gallons per person per day is more realistic.
Storage:
The best solution to your water supply needs is a well or spring that has been tested.
If that isn't available you should build a large cistern. If a well is over 25 feet deep a
hand pump will not work, so you might need to consider a solar powered pump. If
the cistern is built high enough it will provide enough pressure to "gravity flow" into
your homes existing plumbing.
Decontamination:
Every home water supply should include a filtration system designed to remove
chemicals, sediment etc. Water can be decontaminated by boiling for 5 minutes. This
will kill all bacteria, viruses or parasites that may be present from animal or human
waste. Add 1 minute for every 1000 feet above sea level.
Iodine will also work, but isn't as effective as boiling; especially if the water is
cloudy. One ounce of 2 % tincture iodine is enough to treat 160 gallons of water. Use
4 drops per quart for clear and 8 drops per quart for cloudy water. Let set for 1 hour.
Do not use if you have thyroid problems or are pregnant.
Chlorine Bleach is next in order of effectiveness. It will not kill certain viruses such as
Hepatitis A or certain parasites. Before using, be sure the bleach contains no other
additives such as perfumes...it must be plain bleach. Water treated with chlorine will
store about 6 months. Use 12 drops per quart and wait 1 hour before use.
Food Storage:
Don't try to purchase everything at once. Start out with a 15 day food supply for all
family members; then work up to 30 days, 90 days etc. Every week, buy a little
extra as your budget allows.
This list is merely a suggestion of the bare bones basics. Add to it or Modify it to suit
your needs and tastes. Store all items in food grade buckets, in a cool dry dark
place, add bay leaves and a desiccant then seal bucket with duct tape.
Item:___________________Shelf Life:
50 pounds dried beans.............Indefinite
50 pounds cornmeal......................."
50 pounds oats..............................."
50 pounds sugar............................."
50 pounds salt................................"
25 pounds instant potatoes............."
25 pounds rice................................"
10 pounds coffee............................"
05 pounds each pepper, baking soda, baking powder, yeast
Honey............................................"
05 pounds Peanut butter................."
Tea................................................"
60 packs of Kool Aid........................."
100 packs Ramon noodles, instant soup etc.
Beef / Chicken bullion cubes
Canned vegetables......................2-3 years
Canned meat................................1 year
Canned juice...............................5-1 year
1 gallon white vinegar................indefinite
.5 gallon olive oil
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NMS section 11 (12/1/03)

Post by Nick on Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:52 pm

© 2001, 2003 awrm.org All Rights Reserved.
55
NATIONAL MILITIA STANDARDS
www.awrm.org
11.0 EVACUATION AND MOBILIZATION SOP
An evacuation may become necessary for many reasons; including natural or
manmade disasters, civil unrest, terrorism etc. If you wait until the last minute to
evacuate; you will be caught up in the masses of panic stricken sheep who don't
have a clue what to do. There may be rioting, looting and panic buying at the stores
by the unprepared. Martial law will be declared with curfews, gas and food rationing,
checkpoints and roadblocks. DO NOT get caught in this mess.
You must preplan for these events. You must have somewhere to retreat to set up in
advance and must have a Primary route as well as 2 secondary routes planned.
Always keep your gear packed and ready to go. Keep the gas tank full at all times
and have at least a 5 gallon can in reserve. Every vehicle must be equipped with a
mobility kit.
Vehicle Mobility Kit:
2 Cans Fix A Flat plus a tire plug kit
1 Spare tire, jack and lug wrench
1 12 Volt compressor
1 Set of tire chains
1 Come along or winch
1 Chain saw
1 Each...axe / shovel
1 Bolt cutter
1 5 gallon can of gas
1 Each fuel and oil filter, 5 quarts oil
1 spare fan belts, headlight, fuses
1 Set basic tools
1 Fire extinguisher
1 Spotlight
1 Flashlight and spare batteries
1 10 -11 Meter SSB radio
1 200 channel scanner
EVAC ROUTES:
Prior reconnaissance is an absolute must. You will need a State Atlas and a USGS
map of your Area of Operations. You need to plan out 3 routes in advance. The
primary route should be the most direct possible. Avoid all interstates and major
state highways. The alternate routes should be back roads as far off the beaten path
as possible. When selecting a route; look for all choke points and possible ambush
sites so that you wont be surprised when the time comes. Look for out of the way
sites to pre-deploy supplies along the way. Once you have selected your routes;
drive them night and day under various conditions. You must familiarize yourself
with these routes and come to know them like the back of your hand. You must
know them well enough to drive them without lights.
OPSEC AND CONVOY OPS:
The First step in preparing your evacuation plan is the predesignation of an initial
rendezvous point. It should be centrally located and enroute to the designated area
of operations. Try to pick a high elevation that will provide a degree of cover and
concealment. If the route is over 30 miles long, or passes through several small
towns, then you must set up intermediate rally points, using the same criteria as
before.
Second, the Order of March: First in line will be the lightest and least capable
vehicle, carrying the forward security element. If the first vehicle crosses obstacles
unassisted, then the rest of the convoy should have no problem. Second in line is the
heaviest and most capable vehicle carrying tow lines, winch, chain saw, axes and
other vehicle recovery and road clearing equipment. In the event of a stuck vehicle
or road block, this equipment will be used to clear it. The forward security element
will position itself for rapid deployment in the event of an ambush during clearing
operations. Third and Fourth in line will be the supply vehicles and support
personnel. Last in line will be the rear security element in a heavy 4WD, carrying
equipment to create roadblocks.
Third, ON the march, maintain maximum safe interval between vehicles. Don't bunch
up; particularly at obstacles or possible ambush points. Each vehicle should remain
in sight and small arms range of the vehicle in front and behind it. Minimize exposure
by maintaining the interval at temporary halts.
Fourth: Radio Communications must be maintained between vehicles. Use all
COMSEC measures including the alternate brevity code. Make no on the air
references to road or place names, landmarks etc. Do not engage in senseless
chatter. Maintain radio silence as much as possible.
Fifth: Laager (disperse in a circle) all vehicles under camoflauge and concealment
during any prolonged halt. Maintain light and noise discipline at all times. Both light
and noise travel long distances at night in rural areas. Keep two sentries patrolling
the circle in opposite directions. so they can keep watch on the laager and each
other. Rotate sentries every 4 hours.
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NMS RQ Score Card (3-28-04)

Post by Nick on Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:53 pm


Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
1. Head Shots (25 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform five times each, all shots offhand - all shots to the body are counted
as a miss, start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
a. 25 meters; Low Ready; 2.0 sec
b. 25 meters; Low Ready WEAK SIDE; 3.0 sec
Time

Score

Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
2. Chest Shots (20 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform five times each, all shots offhand - all shots to the head are counted
as a miss. Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
a. 50 meters; Low Ready; 2.0 sec
b. 50 meters; Low Ready WEAK SIDE; 3.0 sec
Time
Score

Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
3. Chest Shots (15 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform five times each, all shots offhand, or kneeling - shots to the
head are counted as a miss. Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
a. 100 meters; Low Ready; 4.0 sec
Time

Score


Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
4. Chest Shots (10 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform five times each, all shots kneeling or prone - start standing - all shots
to the head are counted as a miss. Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
a. 200 meters; Low Ready; 5.0 sec
Time

Score



Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
5a. Malfunction Drills (10 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform three times each
Manually induce malfunction, then at the 'beep' Clear Malfunction and place
one hit on target at 50 meters. Start position is rifle shouldered – sights on target
and safety ON.
a. Position One; 4.0 sec
(TAP RACK BANG)
Time

Score


Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
5b. Malfunction Drills (10 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform three times each
Manually induce malfunction, then at the 'beep' Clear Malfunction and place
one hit on target at 50 meters. Start position is rifle shouldered, sights on target
and safety OFF.
b. Position Two; 4.0 sec
(STOVEPIPE)
Time

Score


Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
5c. Malfunction Drills(10 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform three times each
Manually induce malfunction, then at the 'beep' Clear Malfunction and place
one hit on target at 50 meters. Start position is rifle shouldered, sights on target
and safety OFF.
c. Position Three; 11.0 sec
(FEEDWAY STOPPAGE – DOUBLE FEED)
Time

Score


Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
6. Magazine Changes(10 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform three times; starting position is with a round in the chamber and
an EMPTY magazine. Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
Fire one shot, reload and fire one shot at 50 meters WITHOUT retaining
magazine, all mag pouches secured!
a. Mag change without retention; 9.0 sec
Time

Score


Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
7. Magazine Changes(10 Jumping Jacks prior to
shooting)
Perform three times; starting position is with rifle/magazine fully loaded.
Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON. Fire one shot, reload and fire one
shot at 50 meters WITH retaining magazine, all mag pouches secured!
a. Mag Change with retention 11.0 sec
Time

Score


Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
8a. Close Range Shooting from shoulder or Underarm Assault
(10 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform three times each side. Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
a. 3 meters; 0.6 sec
Time


Score


Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
8b. Close Range Shooting from shoulder or Underarm Assault
(10 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform three times each side. Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
b. 7 meters; 0.8 sec
Time


Score


Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
8c. Close Range Shooting from shoulder or Underarm Assault
(10 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform three times each side. Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
c. 10 meters; 1.2 sec
Time


Score


Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
9a. Multiple Targets(10 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform twice each; Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
Targets are spaced with 1 meter between each target.
a. 5 meters; 2 targets; 1.2 sec
Time

Score



Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
9b. Multiple Targets (10 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform twice each; Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
Targets are spaced with 1 meter between each target.
b. 5 meters; 3 targets; 1.5 sec
Time

Score



Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
9c. Multiple Targets (10 Jumping Jacks prior to shooting)
Perform twice each; Start position is patrol/low ready – safety ON.
Targets are spaced with 1 meter between each target.
c. 5 meters; 4 targets; 1.8 sec
Time

Score



Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
DMR QUALIFICATION – SHOT LAST after finishing the course.
Perform five times each, all shots kneeling or prone - start standing – head shots
ONLY all others shots are counted as a miss. Start position - patrol ready, safety ON.
a. 200 meters; Low Ready; 6.0 sec HEAD SHOTS ONLY
Score
Time

Shooter’s NAME:___________________________________ date:_______
Rifle:______________ Caliber:________________ Major/Minor
For IPSC Targets: "A", "B" and "C" zones score 0 points all calibers; "D" zone
is .5 point multiplier for 'major' caliber and 1 point multiplier for 'minor' caliber.
Shots fired after par-time has elapsed - add that many seconds to the score
(i.e. last shot was fired 1.37 seconds after par time elapsed - add 1.37 points to
score)
For all shots outside the "0" zone - add up all shots, times that by the major
or minor multiplier and that number is added to the score
(i.e. shooter had 2 shots outside the "0" scoring zone and was shooting minor
caliber - so take the 2 shots times the "1" (for minor caliber) which equals
2 - so add 2 points to the final score.
If he were shooting major caliber is would be 2 shots, times .5 (major multiplier)
equals 1 point added to final score.)
MAXIMUM = 0 EXPERT = 1-39 SHARPSHOOTER = 40-77
MARKSMAN = 78-116
(BASIC RECRUIT QUALIFICATION IS TO COMPLETE THE COURSE
WITH 117-231 POINTS WITH NO TIME LIMIT)
IF 200 yard range is unavailable - the scoring is: MAX = 0 EXPERT = 1-36
SHARPSHOOTER = 37-72 MARKSMAN = 73-108
BASIC RECRUIT QUALIFICATION IS TO COMPLETE THE COURSE
WITH 109-216 POINTS WITH NO TIME LIMIT
NOTE ON CARD THAT SCORING WAS NOT PERFORMED AT 200 YARDS
DMR MUST SCORE AS EXPERT AND ACHIEVE HAVE ALL FIVE
DMR HEAD SHOTS IN HEAD ZONE IN TIME LIMIT.
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Re: NMS section 1 (12/1/03)

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